Financial Aid FAQs

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is a federal financial aid form completed by parents and students. The form is analyzed and sent to schools you indicate. Ideally, this form is completed in January of your senior year and every January thereafter while attending college.

The 2016–17 FAFSA will become available on Jan. 1, 2016, for the 2016–17 “award year” (which runs from July 1, 2016, to June 30, 2017).

The 2017–18 FAFSA will become available on Oct. 1, 2016. A student can submit the FAFSA any time until the end of the award year to apply for federal aid. However, it’s important to note that state higher education agencies and many colleges use FAFSA information to determine a student’s eligibility for aid from their state or school funds. Therefore, the student should check fafsa.gov for his or her state deadline and the college’s website for the school’s deadline.

Note: An early submission of the 2017-18 FAFSA, does not mean financial aid awards will be available early. Information about your 2017-18 financial awards are scheduled to be available approximately early March, same as each academic year.

Your parents’ contribution will be lower if they are helping more than one child through college at the same time.

The parent you lived with the longest amount of time during the past 12 months should fill out the application. If you didn’t live with either parent, or lived with each parent for an equal number of days, the application should be filled out by the parent who provided the most financial support for you during the last 12 months.

No. You will be asked to provide copies of the legal guardianship documentation.

Financial aid forms can be found here.

You will be offered the option of getting one in real time when you fill out the online FAFSA. You can also apply for a FSA ID in advance at www.fsaid.ed.gov. Your FSA ID will be required to electronically sign your FAFSA and any legally binding documents.

To remain eligible for financial aid at Campbell, you must make reasonable academic progress toward your degree. Reasonable academic progress is a federal government requirement, and is measured by a number of factors, including, but not limited to, grade point average and the number of credit hours passed.

For financial aid purposes, an undergraduate student is usually classified as a dependent and is expected to have access to parental financial resources if he/she is not married, does not have legal dependents, including children that he/she supports more than 50%, is not a veteran, is not currently serving on active duty (including National Guard or Reserves activated by Federal Authority) in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training, was not an orphan, ward of the court, or foster child at the age of 13 or any time thereafter, is not an emancipated minor, in legal guardianship, or unaccompanied youth who is homeless or is self-supporting and at risk of homelessness and is under 24 years of age.

For financial aid purposes, a student is classified as an independent student if at least one of the following applies: he/she is 24 years of age or older, is married, is enrolled in a graduate or professional educational program (beyond a bachelor’s degree), has legal dependents other than a spouse, was an orphan, foster child, or ward/ dependent of the court at any time since the age of 13, is an emancipated minor, in legal guardianship or was determined at any time since July 1, 2010, to be an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or was self-supporting and at risk of being homeless, is a veteran of the US armed forces (“A veteran is a student who has engaged in active service in the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines or Coast Guard and was released under a condition other than dishonorable—including a student who attended a U.S. military academy but withdrew in good standing— or a student who is not a veteran now but will be a veteran by June 30) – or is currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training and activated by Federal Authority.

A need-based loan on which the interest is paid by the federal government while the borrower is enrolled in school or during grace and deferment periods.

 

A non need-based loan for which borrowers are responsible for interest from the date the loan is disbursed.