Evolution vs. Creation debate comes to Campbell’s SGA lecture series

February 22, 2012 | 4 Comments

Evolution vs. Creation debate comes to Campbell’s SGA lecture series

BUIES CREEK - A renown author of human origins was the keynote speaker at the Student Government Association’s lecture series Tuesday night in Turner Auditorium.

Dr. Denis Lamoureaux, an Associate Professor of Science and Religion at St. Joseph’s College in the University of Alberta, spoke on the theories of evolution and creationism at SGA’s annual event.

Lamoureux holds three doctoral degrees in dentistry, theology and biology; is a member of the executive council of the Canadian Scientific and Christian Affiliation; is a Fellow of the American Scientific Affiliation and has been cited in the Who's Who of Theology and Science.

“I believe that the Bible is inspired by the Holy Spirit of God,” said Lamoureux, who has written “Evolutionary Creation” and “I Love Jesus and I Accept Evolution.” “I am an unapologetic evolutionist; I have yet to see any evidence to falsify it.”

Lamoureux presented a plethora of viewpoints on the debate, but his overall message was simple: Don’t let the debate be divisive; learn to live with people of different views.

“I think we need to do that for the sake of the body of Christ,” he said. “We should move beyond this evolution and creation debate because it is a false dichotomy; it limits the number of choices that you have.”

The lecture concluded with a panel of Lamoureux and three Campbell professors - Dr. Adam English from the Department of Religion, biology professor Dr. John Bartlett  Biology and chemistry professor Dr. Michael Wells. Students from the audience had the opportunity to ask the panel questions as well.

Lamoureux challenged everyone who is involved in the debate of evolution and creation to heed the words of Sir Francis Bacon:

“Let no man or woman, out of conceit or laziness, think or believe that anyone can search too far or be too well informed in the Book of God’s Words or the Book of God’s Works: Religion or science. Instead, let everyone endlessly improve their understanding of both.”

 

By Jonathan Bridges, Campbell University Communications intern

Photo: (From left to right) Campbell professor Dr. Ann Ortiz, professor Dr. Adam English and featured speaker Dr. Denis Lamoureux

Comments

There is a simple reason that the “only” expert on what Moses wrote was not invited:  Because Moses is dead.  No one else knows the “truth” about what Moses wrote.  Everyone else can only speculate.

By Michael on February 26, 2012 - 2:28pm

To say that evolution tries to exclude God is misleading, I think evolution only tries to explain how life tends to change over time to adapt better to its environment.  Evolution does not try to explain how life started.  Science today cannot fully explain currently how life started.  Why is a world in which God created the universe and then natural processes (initially put in motion by him) created everything else so difficult to accept for some evangelicals? They are definitely on the fringe of the Christian community as a whole and of the overall world population….

By David Gonzalez on February 26, 2012 - 11:18am

It’s surprising that some Christian intellectuals don’t understand what evolution is - an explanation of how all living things came to be, using only NATURAListic mechanisms. SUPERnatural mechanisms such as God are not required. Therefore by defintion, God is excluded. To say that God was involved in evolution is like saying that God was involved in a process that totally excluded God.

By Maureen Kapitola on February 23, 2012 - 10:22pm

Why is it that you invite a person that does not understand the scripture to speak on Creation and Evolution?  Why is it that you refuse to invite the only expert on Genesis, who would convey the truth about what Moses wrote?

What is your real agenda?  To mislead the students?

Herman Cummings
706 662-2893
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

By Herman Cummings on February 23, 2012 - 1:33pm

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