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Religion and Philosophy

Religion/Philosophy and the General College Curriculum | Religion
Religion With Concentration in Biblical Studies
Religion With Concentration in Theology
Religion With Concentration in Christian History
 
Religion Course Listing
| Philosophy Course Listing

Professor:  Dr. Penny

Associate Professor: Dr. Jonas (Chairman)

Assistant Professors: Dr. Lopez, Dr. English

Professor Emeritus: Dr. Keyser

Adjunct Faculty: Dr. Whiteman, Dr. Simmons, Dr. Eddy, Dr. Vandergriff, Dr. Greene, Rev. Newell

Objectives of the Religion and Philosophy Department

  1. To offer required courses in the General College Curriculum designed to acquaint students with the Judeo-Christian tradition.
  2. To offer advanced elective courses in religion and philosophy for those students who desire to explore, beyond an introductory level, specific subjects due to personal interest.
  3. To offer a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Religion and with the option of concentrations in biblical studies, theology, or Christian history as preparation for seminary education or graduate work in the field of religion.
  4. To offer minors in religion for those students who have further interest beyond the level of the General College Curriculum.
  5. To offer a learning environment where our students can find ways to integrate their  personal faith with their academic skills.

Religion/Philosophy and the General College Curriculum
Candidates for degrees requiring three hours of religion must take RELG 125.

Candidates for degrees requiring six hours of religion must take RELG 125 (Religion majors are an  exception, who will normally satisfy this requirement by taking RELG 202 and 212.) and a second course chosen from the following religion courses: RELG 202, RELG 212, RELG 222, RELG 224, RELG 236, RELG 251,  RELG 340.

Religion and/or philosophy courses count toward fulfilling the social science/humanities requirement of six hours. Philosophy courses do not count toward fulfilling the religion requirement.

Requirements for a Major in Religion (CIP 38.0201)
Students will complete a curriculum that consists of forty hours of religion beyond the General College Curriculum requirements. Students will take RELG 202 Old Testament Survey and RELG 212 New Testament Survey to satisfy the General College Curriculum religion requirement and must take PHIL 121 Introduction to Philosophy to satisfy three hours of the social science/humanities requirement. Students will then be required to complete the following:

  1. A departmental core of fifteen semester hours beyond the General College Curriculum, consisting of RELG 222 Christian Beliefs, 224 Christian Ethics, 226 Spiritual Formation for Theological Education, 236 Introduction to Church History, and 251 World Religions.
  2. Three semester hours from each of the following areas:
    1. Biblical Studies: RELG 301 Pentateuch, 302 Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament, 304 Poetic and Wisdom Literature, 305 Jewish Backgrounds to the New Testament, 313 Teachings of Jesus, 314 Paul, and 317 John.
    2. Theological Studies:  RELG 321 Contemporary Theology, 323 Philosophy of Religion, 324 Ancient and Medieval Theology and  Philosophy, 325 Modern Theology and Philosophy.
    3. Christian History:   332 Early Christianity, 333 Reformation, 334 Religion in America, 335 Baptist History.
    4. Religion and Society Studies: RELG 340.
  3. Nine elective hours of Religion all of which must be at the 300-level.
  4. RELG 402 Senior Seminar.

Requirements for a Major in Religion with a Concentration in Biblical Studies  (CIP 38.0201)
Some students  who major in religion may choose to concentrate in biblical studies.   Such students will complete a curriculum that consists of forty hours of religion beyond the General College Curriculum requirements.  Students who choose this concentration will take RELG 202 Old Testament Survey and RELG 212 New Testament Survey to satisfy the General College Curriculum religion requirement and must take PHIL 121 Introduction to Philosophy to satisfy three hours of the social science/humanities requirement.  Students in this concentration are required to complete the following:

  1. A departmental core of fifteen semester hours beyond the General College Curriculum, consisting of RELG 222 Christian Beliefs, 224 Christian Ethics, 226 Spiritual Formation for Theological Education, 236 Introduction to Church History, and 251 World Religions.
  2. Three semester hours from each of the following areas:
    1. Christian History:  RELG 332 Early Christianity, 333 Reformation, 334 Religion in America, 335 Baptist History.
    2. Theological  Studies: RELG 321 Contemporary Theology, 323 Philosophy of Religion, 324 Ancient and Medieval Theology and Philosophy, 325 Modern Theology and Philosophy.
    3. Religion and Society: RELG 340 Family.
  3. Twelve semester hours of Biblical studies courses chosen from the following:  RELG 301 Pentateuch, 302 Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament, 304 Poetic and Wisdom Literature, 305 Jewish Backgrounds to the New Testament, 313 Teachings of Jesus, 314 Paul, and 317 John.
  4. RELG 402 Senior Seminar (in Biblical studies).
  5. The department strongly encourages the students concentrating in biblical studies to choose Greek for fulfillment of the foreign language requirement in the General College Curriculum.

Requirements for a Major in Religion with a Concentration in Theology (CIP 38.0201)
Some students who major in religion may choose to concentrate in theology.  Such students will complete a curriculum that consists of forty hours of religion beyond the General College Curriculum requirements.  Students who choose this concentration will take RELG 202 Old Testament Survey and RELG 212 New Testament Survey to satisfy the General College Curriculum religion requirement and must take PHIL 121 Introduction to Philosophy to satisfy three hours of the social science/humanities requirement.  Students in this concentration are required to complete the following:

  1. A departmental core of fifteen semester hours beyond the General College Curriculum, consisting of RELG 222 Christian Beliefs, 224 Christian Ethics, 226 Spiritual Formation for Theological Education, 236 Introduction to Church History, and 251 World Religions.
  2. Three semester hours from each of the following areas:
    1. Christian History:  RELG 332 Early Christianity, 333 Reformation, 334 Religion in America, 335 Baptist History.
    2. Biblical Studies: RELG 301 Pentateuch, 302 Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament, 304  Poetic and Wisdom Literature, 305 Jewish Backgrounds to the New Testament, 313 Teachings of Jesus, 314 Paul, and 317 John.
    3. Religion and Society: RELG 340 Family.
  3. Twelve semester hours of theology chosen from the following :  RELG 321 Contemporary Theology,  323 Philosophy of Religion, 324 Ancient and Medieval Theology and Philosophy, 325 Modern Theology and Philosophy, 332 Early Christianity, 333 Reformation.
  4. RELG 402 Senior Seminar (in theology).

Requirements for a Major in Religion with a Concentration in Christian History. (CIP 38.0201)
Some students who major in religion may choose to concentrate in Christian History.  Such students will complete a curriculum that consists of forty hours of religion beyond the General College Curriculum requirements.  Students who choose this concentration will take RELG 202 Old Testament Survey and RELG 212 New Testament Survey to satisfy the General College Curriculum religion requirement and will take PHIL 121 Introduction to Philosophy to satisfy three hours of the social science/humanities requirement.  Students in this concentration are required to complete the following:

  1. A department core of fifteen semester hours beyond the General College Curriculum, consisting of RELG 222 Christian Beliefs, 226 Spiritual Formation for Theological Education, 224 Christian Ethics, 236 Introduction to Church History, 251 World Religions.
  2. Three semester hours from each of the following areas:
    1. Biblical studies:  RELG 301 Pentateuch, 302 Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament, 304 Poetic  and Wisdom Literature, 305 Jewish Backgrounds to the New Testament, 313 Teachings of Jesus, 314 Paul, and 317 John.
    2. Theological Studies:  RELG 321 Contemporary Theology, 323 Philosophy of Religion, 324   Ancient and Medieval Theology and Philosophy, 325 Modern Theology and Philosophy.
    3. Religion and Society:  Religion 340 Family
  3. Twelve semester hours of Christian history chosen from the following:  RELG 332 Early Christianity, 333 Reformation, 334 Religion in America, 335 Baptist History, 324 Ancient and Medieval Theology and Philosophy, 325 Modern Theology and Philosophy.
  4. RELG 402 Senior Seminar (in Christian History).

Other Departmental Requirements for Majors

  1. Residence requirement: All students majoring in religion are required to complete a minimum of eighteen hours of advanced Religion courses at Campbell.
  2. Grade point average requirements for graduation: The major must have an overall average of "C" or better for each of the following categories of courses: all work attempted; all work attempted at Campbell; all religion courses attempted; all religion courses attempted at Campbell.
  3. English requirement: Any departmental major may be required to take an English proficiency test. If the student requires additional English studies, placement will be made by the English Department.

Requirements for Minor/Concentration in Religion
A minor/concentration is offered in religion. Students must complete eighteen hours beyond the General College Curriculum requirements, with nine hours numbered 300 and above. The Department requires a residency of at least twelve hours in order to receive a Religion Minor. Courses are to be chosen under the guidance of the department chairman or a religion faculty adviser.

Religion Course Listing (RELG 000)

125 Introduction to Christianity (3)
A study of the biblical foundations, historical development, and traditional beliefs and practices of Christianity and its impact on Western culture and on the lives of those who embrace it. Religion 125 is prerequisite to all other religion courses (except for Religion majors, who normally begin with 202 and 212).

200 Special Topics in Religion (3)
Special topics related to the field of Religion are explored.

202 Old Testament Survey (3)
A survey of the Old Testament designed to introduce the student to the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel.

212 New Testament Survey (3)
A survey of the literature of the New Testament in the context of the early Christian church.

222 Christian Beliefs (3)
A study of fundamental beliefs within the Christian faith. Concepts discussed include: God, revelation, faith, Christ, Holy Spirit, history, evil, and eschatology.

224 Christian Ethics (3)
A study of the Judeo-Christian heritage in ethics with attention to its Biblical and theological foundations. In addition, there will be an examination of how Christian ethics bears upon various contemporary moral issues.

226 Spiritual Formation for Theological Education (3)
An introduction to the academic study of the field of religion with particular attention given to spiritual formation and blending of the cognitive with the affective.

236 Introduction to Church History (3)
A historical study of the major movements, people, and thoughts throughout the history of  Christianity.

251 World Religions (3)
A survey of the major religions of the world.

262 Introduction to Christian Education (3)
A leadership approach to the administrative task. The course offers an introduction to principles which should be employed by those who hold church leadership responsibilities.

301 Pentateuch (3)
A study of the historical context and theological themes of Genesis through Deuteronomy.  Prerequisite:  RELG 202.

302 Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament (3)
A study of selected prophetic books in their historical contexts. Prerequisite: RELG 202.

304 Poetic and Wisdom Literature (3)
A study of Old Testament poetic and wisdom literature in its cultural setting.  Prerequisite: RELG 202.

305 Jewish Backgrounds to the New Testament (3)
A study of the historical context and literature of the period leading up to the New Testament.  Prerequisite:  RELG 202 and 212.

313 Teachings of Jesus (3)
A study of the message of Jesus recorded in the first three Gospels with special attention given to the Sermon on the Mount and the parables of Jesus. Prerequisite: RELG 212.

3l4 Paul (3)
A study of Paulís life, letters, and thought based on the letters and Acts critically examined. Prerequisite: RELG 212.

317 The Gospel of John (3)
A study of the fourth Gospel through an extensive investigation of the book itself along with a special consideration of its historical setting and its meaning for today. Prerequisite: RELG 212.

321 Contemporary Theology (3)
A survey of the current state of theology.  A broad range of movements, issues, and global perspectives will be examined.  Treatment will be given to works published within the last five to ten years.  Prerequisite RELG 222 or PHIL 121.

323 Philosophy of Religion (3)
An examination of basic issues in philosophy of religion. Included in the discussion are: the relation between faith and reason, Godís existence, the problem of evil, the afterlife, and the function of religious language. Prerequisite: RELG 222 or PHIL 121.

324 Ancient and Medieval Theology and Philosophy (3)
A historical survey of theology and philosophy, beginning with the ancient Greeks and extending through the Middle Ages. The study includes Plato, Aristotle, the apostolic fathers, Irenaeus, Athanasius,  Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, Lady Julian of Norwich, as well as some Jewish and Islamic thinkers.  Prerequisite: RELG 222 or PHIL 121.

325 Modern Theology and Philosophy (3)
A historical survey of theology and philosophy from the time of the Reformation to the twentieth century.  Attention is given to such names as Luther, Calvin, Wesley, Locke, Kant, Scheiermacher, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Harnack, Barth, and Bonhoeffer.  Prerequisite: RELG 222 or PHIL 121.

332  Early Christianity (3)
A survey of Christianity from the early church in Jerusalem through the fifth century.  Attention will be given to significant persons, controversies theological development, and movements during this era.  Prerequisite:   RELG 236.

333 Reformation (3)
A study of the Reformation of the Sixteenth century and its precursors including the Renaissance.  Particular attention will be devoted to the life and writings of the major sixteenth century reformers.  Prerequisite:  RELG 236

334 Religion in America (3)
A study of the history, ideas, and influence of religion in America. Prerequisite: RELG 236.

335 Baptist History (3)
A study of Baptists, including their origins, history, principles, and practices. Prerequisite: RELG 236.

340 Family (3) (Sociology 340)
A socio-cultural study of the institution of the family as it exists in a cultural setting. Key emphasis is given to the American family system and the crucial issues that affect its welfare. Topics include mate selection, husband-wife relationships, marital interactions, marital disruption, and dual career marriages.

362 Youth Ministry (3)
A study of the social and spiritual development of young people. The course will seek to equip the youth minister with cognitive skills, resources, and techniques for ministry with young people through the church. A library of resources for youth programs and projects will be developed for use by the student carrying out a comprehensive youth program in a local church.

402 Senior Seminar (4)
Advanced investigation and research on selected topics in biblical studies, church history, theology, and philosophy.

Philosophy Course Listing (PHIL 000)

121 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
An examination of basic philosophical issues which arise in the fields of ethics, political philosophy, theory of knowledge, philosophy of religion, and metaphysics.

Greek Course Listing (GREE 000)

101-102 Elementary Greek (3,3)
A survey of the elements of Hellenistic (koinť) Greek grammar, illustrated systematically from the Greek New Testament.

201-202 Intermediate Greek (3,3)
Readings from the Greek New Testament with a review of grammar at the intermediate level. Introduction to Greek-based exegetical tools and the textual apparatus. Prerequisites: GREE 101 - 102.

 

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