Online Catalog

General Information

Undergraduate Academic Policies

Financial Information

Department and Course Descriptions

Table of Contents

 

 

Professional Education

Admission Policy for Teacher Education
Requirements for a North Carolina Class "A" Teaching License
Elementary Education (K-6) | Middle Grades (6-9) | Birth-Kindergarten (B-K)
Secondary, K-12, and Vocational Education
Biology (9-12 Licensure) | English (9-12 Licensure)
French (K-12 Licensure) | Family and Consumer Sciences (7-12 Licensure)  Mathematics (9-12 Licensure) | Music Education (K-12 Licensure) 
Physical Education (K-12 Licensure)
Social Science (9-12 Licensure) | Spanish (K-12 Licensure) 
Educational Studies (non-licensure) | Education Course Listing

Professors: Dr. Nery (Dean, School of Education)

Associate Professors: Dr. Enzor, Dr. Hatcher, Dr. Kendrick, Dr. Durham, Dr. Engel, Dr. Morrison

Assistant Professors: Dr. Maidon, Dr. Powell, Dr. Roukema

Adjunct Instructors: Ms. Blalock, Mr. Dillon, Ms. Payne, Ms. Wiggins

Director of the Teacher Education Program: Dr. Powell
Coordinator of Undergraduate Elementary Education: Dr. Powell
Coordinator of Undergraduate Middle Grades Education: Dr. Roukema
Coordinator of Birth-Kindergarten: Dr. Chester
Coordinator of Educational studies: Dr. Powell
Discipline Coordinator for Biology Education: Dr. Metz
Discipline Coordinator for English Education: Ms. Hanemann
Discipline Coordinator for Foreign Languages Education: Dr. Ortiz
Discipline Coordinator for Family and Consumer Sciences: Dr. Nery
Discipline Coordinator for Mathematics Education: Ms. Walker
Discipline Coordinator for Music Education: Dr. Whitley
Discipline Coordinator for Physical Education: Dr. Woolard
Discipline Coordinator for Social Studies Education: Dr. J. Martin

Admission Policy for Teacher Education
All students desiring a program leading to teacher licensure must meet all requirements for (1) admission to the Teacher Education Program, and (2) admission to student teaching. Admission to and completion of student teaching do not guarantee licensure. Licensure is contingent upon successful completion of all State Board of Education requirements for the licensure sought.

Application for admission to the teacher education program should be submitted during the second semester of the student’s sophomore year. All requirements for formal admission to Teacher Education must be met by the beginning of the semester prior to the semester in which student teaching is to be done.

Criteria for Admission to the Program

The criteria for admission to the program include the following:

  1. A grade point average of 2.5 or better in overall scholastic work; a "C" or better in all courses in the major field or concentration; a "C" or better in all required professional education courses.
  2. Approval of the School of Education and the major department, if a secondary, K-12, or vocational education major.
  3. No academic, disciplinary, or social probations.
  4. Satisfactory scores on the Praxis I Examination, Pre-professional Skills Test (PPST).
  5. Recommendation by two faculty members, one of whom must be a faculty member from Professional Education.

Applications for practicum placements must be submitted by September 15 for spring semester placements, and by February 15 for fall semester placements. Applications for student teaching placements must be submitted by February 15 for fall semester placements and by September 15 for spring semester placements.

Requirements for a North Carolina Class "A" Teaching License
To qualify for Campbell University’s recommendation for an initial North Carolina Class “A” teaching license, a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree must be earned in one of the programs listed below. In addition, all professional education and licensure requirements must be met. Satisfactory scores on the Praxis I and Praxis II Examinations (including all specialty area tests required by North Carolina), must be submitted to the Dean’s office, along with the other required completed forms for licensure.

Course Requirements for the Professional Education Programs

Elementary Education (K-6) (CIP 13.1202)
The elementary education (K-6) program is designed to prepare a student for licensure to teach at the elementary school level. Course requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education are as follows:

English 100, 101, 102, and two of the following courses: 201, 202, 203, 204, 205; Foreign Language through 201; Music 321; Art 321; Theatre 115 and 131; History 111, 112, 221 or 222, and 331 or 332; Government 229; Geography 113 or 114; Sociology 345; Math 111, 203; Psychology 222; Religion 125 and a religion elective at or above the 200-level; two laboratory science courses; Exercise Science 111 or 112, 185, and 334; Education 221, 225 341, 351, 373, 400, 401, 402, 431, 435, 448, 450, 454, 455, 456, and 457.

A grade of "C" or better must be earned in all required education courses.

Middle Grades (6-9) (CIP 13.1203)
The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in middle grades education requires two concentration areas, social studies and language arts, in addition to the core curriculum and professional education courses. Application has been made to the State of North Carolina to expand the choice of concentration areas to include science and mathematics.

All majors are required to take the following core courses: English 100, 101, 102, and two of the following courses: 201, 202, 203, 204, 205; History 111 and 112; Sociology 345; Foreign Language through 201; Religion 125 and a religion elective at or above the 200-level; two laboratory science courses; Mathematics 111 and 160; Exercise Science 111 or 112, and185; Art, Music, or Theater 131; Psychology 222 and 0-3 hours of elective hours depending upon concentration choices.

All majors are required to take the following professional education courses and must earn a “C” or better in each:  Education 221, 341, 373, 402, 431, 441, 454, 455, 456, 457, and 502.

Licensure Requirements for Middle Grades Education:  

Students seeking licensure in middle grades education must choose a primary and a secondary area of concentration.  Twenty-four hours of course work must be completed for a primary area of concentration, and eighteen hours of course work must be completed in the secondary area of concentration.  A grade of “C” or better must be earned in all concentration area courses as well as all education courses.  

English/Language Arts Concentration:
                Primary: Engl. 302, Engl. 303, Engl. 420 (Children’s Literature); and 3 of the following: Engl. 301, 405, 410, 413, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420.
                Secondary: Engl. 302, Engl. 303, Engl. 420 (Children’s Literature); and 1 of the following: Engl. 301, 405, 410, 413, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420.  

Social Studies Concentration:  (must also take Professional Education course EDUC 449)
                Primary: Govt. 229, Hist. 221 or 222, Geography 113 or 114, Hist 331 or 332, and 2 of the following: Hist. 351 or 352, Hist. 342, or Hist. 353 or 357.
                Secondary: Govt. 229, Hist. 221 or 222, Geography 113 or 114, and one of the following: Hist. 351 or 352, Hist. 342, or Hist. 353 or 357.  

Birth-Kindergarten (CIP 13.1204)
Student seeking licensure as Birth-Kindergarten teachers are required to take the following: FCSI 227, 337, 338, 340, 341, 342, 365, 402, 457, 458, 490, 510, 515, 530, 540 or 551. EDUC 221, 351, 373, 431, 455, 345, 457.

Secondary, K-12, and Vocational Education
All students seeking licensure as secondary, K-12, or vocational education teachers, are required to take Art 131, Music 131, or Theatre 131 which will meet the general education requirement for the fine arts area. They must also complete two mathematics courses as designated by the major, and all other general college course requirements, including two laboratory science courses, Religion 125, a religion elective at the 200-level or above, Exercise Science 185 and 111 or 112.

Professional Education Sequence:
Students desiring licensure in a secondary school teaching area (9-12), Spanish or French education (K-12), music education (K-12), physical education (K-12) or Family and Consumer Sciences education (7-12) must meet all the criteria for admission to the Teacher Education Program and complete the following courses: Psychology 222, 260; Education 221, 385, 431, 432, 441, 453, 454, the pertinent subject area methods courses, and Education 458, Student Teaching.

Licensure Requirements for Secondary, K-12, and Vocational Education Majors

Biology (9-12 Licensure) (CIP 13.1322)
A minimum of thirty-five semester hours is required, including Biology 111, 201, 202, 203, 205, 327, 342, and 430 or 437; Mathematics 112 or 122, and 160; Chemistry 111, 113, and 227; Physics 221 and 222; Science Education 453; and successful completion of the general education and the professional education sequences.

English (9-12 Licensure) (CIP 13.1305)
The English major seeking teaching licensure must complete English 101 and 102; 201, 202, 203 and 204; 302 or 424, and 303; at least three of the following survey courses: 401, 403, 404, 405, and 406; 407 or 415; 408 or 416 or 417; 409 or 411; 410; 453; two approved English electives; and the successful completion of general education requirements and the professional education sequences.

French (K-12 Licensure) (CIP 13.1325)
Thirty-six hours are required in the major, including French 201, 202, 221, 222, 231, 232, 300, 301, 305 400; two additional literature courses; and successful completion of the general education and the professional education sequences.

Family and Consumer Sciences (7-12 Licensure) (CIP 13.1308)
All majors seeking licensure must complete 33 semester hours in the areas of foods and nutrition, child development, family relationships, clothing and textiles, the home and its furnishings, consumer education, career choices, and curriculum methods. In addition, all general education requirements and the professional education sequence must be successfully completed.

Mathematics (9-12 Licensure) (CIP 13.1311)
Thirty-six hours of mathematics are required, at least 18 of which must be at the 300-level or above, including courses in linear algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, modern algebra, and computer science. In addition, all general education requirements and the professional education sequence must be successfully completed.

Music Education (K-12 Licensure) (CIP 13.1312)
All music majors are required to take Music 101, 102, 103, 104, 132, 133, 201, 202, 203, 204, 221, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 331, 332, and 432. Music Education also requires: Music 223, 420, and 421, and 453; half-recital the senior year; minor applied instrument; and successful completion of the general education and the professional education sequence.

Physical Education (K-12 Licensure) (CIP 13.1314)
Majors seeking Physical Education licensure must take Exercise Science (EXER) 131, 132, 201, 202, 221, 311, 324, 325, 331, 333, 338, 339, 431, 432, and 441. In addition, successful completion of the general education requirements and the professional education sequence are required.

Social Science (9-12 Licensure) (CIP 13.1318)
Students seeking social studies teaching licensure must major in one of three disciplines: a) history, b) social science with a history concentration, or c) social science with a government concentration. All majors will complete the following core courses: six semester hours each in economics, geography, and sociology, plus History 111, 112, 221, 222, 453, and the professional education sequence. In addition, a history major must complete six hours of 300/400-level History classes in each of three areas: U.S. history, European history, and Non-Western (Third World) history. The history major will also complete History 444 (Modern Europe) and History 451 (Historiography). The social science major with a history concentration will, in addition to the core courses, complete 12 hours of 300/400 level history classes; six hours of these classes will be in one of three areas: U.S. history, European history, and Non-Western (Third World) history, and three hours each will be taken in the remaining two fields. Both history and social science-history concentration majors will take Government 229 and another three-hour government course. The social science major with a concentration in government, in addition to the core courses cited above, will take Government 229, 230, three government electives, and three additional government classes, at least one each, from three of the four following groups of courses: Policy (Government 334, 336, 337, 338, or 340), International Relations (Government 343, 345, or 448), Political Theory (Government 443, 445, 446, or 447), and Constitutional Law (Government 449 or 450).

Spanish (K-12 Licensure) (CIP 13. 1330)
Thirty-six hours are required for the major, including Spanish 201, 202, 221, 222, 231, 232, 241, 242, 305, 341, 342, and 400. In addition, for Spanish Education majors, successful completion of general education requirements and the professional education sequence are required.

Educational Studies (non-licensure) (CIP 13. 9999)
Students seeking a degree in educational studies must complete 61-64 hours of general college curriculum, 18 hours in a content emphasis (Language Arts, Math, Science, or Social Science), 24 hours in education, and 22-25 hours of electives.

Education Course Listings (EDUC 000)

221 Introduction to Education (3)
A study of the development of our present-day educational system, with emphasis on historical background and development, aims of education in a democracy, duties of the teacher, purpose and development of the curriculum, facilities, support, and control of the schools. The course is designed to be a foundation for further study in education as well as a general college elective. Field experiences are included. Required of all prospective teachers. Offered in the fall, spring, and summer.

225 Writing Seminar (3)
A course designed to assist prospective teachers in further developing their own writing skills, while beginning the study of methodology for teaching writing in grades K-6. Required of all K-6 education majors. Offered in the fall and spring.

341 Child and Adolescent Development (3)
A course designed to provide for a study of prenatal development and infancy, the physical growth, development of motor abilities, and language and thought of the child and adolescent; children’s play and interests, adolescent interests, emotional factors, parent-child relationships; and psychosocial development. Field experiences are included. Required of all prospective elementary teachers. Prerequisite: Psychology 222. Offered in the fall, spring, and summer.

351 Elementary Education Curriculum (3)
A study of the development, philosophy, and goals of the K-6 school with particular attention paid to the curriculum, organizational patterns, and classroom management. Emphasis is placed on planning and evaluating developmentally appropriate experiences for children aged five through twelve, including those with special needs. Field experiences are included. Prerequisite: Education 221. Offered in the Spring.

373 Exceptional Children (3) (Psychology 373)
A study of issues related to the identification, assessment, and instruction of children with special needs, including the academically gifted. The course includes an examination of current definitions of exceptionality, legal issues, teaching strategies, coordination with families and community agencies, and the professional responsibility of the teacher. Prerequisite: Psychology 222. Offered in the fall and summer.

385 Curriculum Trends in K-12 and Secondary Education (3)
A course designed for K-12 and secondary majors incorporating curriculum trends in education. Special emphasis is placed on emerging technologies and uses of the computer for instructional programming; exceptional children including legal issues, discussion of mild disabilities, giftedness, and instructional modification. Attention is paid to developing and improving writing skills through the integration of course content with written assignments. A 20-hour field experience is included to give the students the opportunity to observe current trends in the public school setting. Required for secondary, K-12, and vocational licensure. Offered in the fall.

400 Methods of Teaching Reading (3)
This course includes a study of emergent literacy and the reading process. Students explore a variety of instructional approaches for teaching reading. They also gain understanding in appropriate assessment. Topics and areas of study will include emergent literacy, reading process, phonics, literature focus units, literature circles, and theme cycles. Prerequisite: majors only. Offered in the fall.

401 Children’s Literature (1)
This course includes reading and evaluating literature for children. Special emphasis is given to the integration of quality literature throughout the entire curriculum. Topics and areas of study include realistic fiction, informational books, biographies, poetry, multicultural literature, historical fiction, and modern fantasy. Prerequisite: majors only. Offered in the fall.

402 Teaching Writing In The Elementary/Middle School (2)
This course includes a study of writing as it is taught in elementary and middle grades. The course concentrates on the writing process as it is applied to personal writing, informational writing, poetry, and story writing. Spelling grammar, and handwriting are also covered. Topics and areas of study include personal writing, story writing, informational writing, poetry writing, spelling, grammar, and handwriting. Prerequisite: majors only.  Offered in the spring as part of the block prior to student teaching.

431 Educational Psychology (3)
This course, which is open to junior and senior education majors and psychology majors, includes a study of the application of psychological principles to teaching and learning. Theories of learning, principles of motivation, intelligence, learning styles, teaching models, student assessment, and research methods are studied. Also considered are the implications for education of multicultural diversity. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on using and learning to teach problem-solving strategies. Prerequisite: Psychology 222, with a grade of C or better. Offered in the fall and spring.

432 Practicum (1)
This course is a pre-student teaching course designed to give secondary and K-12 and vocational majors an opportunity to observe, assist, and teach in the public schools. A minimum of 50 hours in an assigned public school classroom is required. At least ten of these hours must involve teaching.

435 Mathematics for Elementary Education (2)
Techniques and methods for teaching mathematics to young children are explored. Special emphasis is given to the use of three-dimensional materials in developing mathematical concepts such as classifying, ordering, the language of sets, one-to-one correspondence, and use of cardinal and ordinal numbers. Laboratory work provides a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts and also experiences with methods and materials appropriate for classroom teaching. Prerequisites: Math 111 and 203 or equivalent. Required for elementary education licensure. Offered in the spring as part of the block prior to student teaching.

441 Teaching Reading in the Middle and Secondary School (3)
A survey course that gives consideration to the nature of reading and a variety of strategies and materials for teaching reading in the content areas. Field experiences in schools constitute part of the course requirements. Required for middle grades and secondary licensure. Offered in the spring as part of the block prior to student teaching.

448 Social Studies for Elementary Education (2)
A study of the development of multidisciplinary basic social studies concepts and understanding of individual and group relationships appropriate for young children. Emphasis is placed on curriculum development, techniques for developing classroom experiences that encourage social growth, cultural awareness, independence, and a personal value system. Required for elementary education licensure. Offered in the fall.

449 Social Studies for Middle Grades Education (2)
This course provides an integrated multidisciplinary study of the interaction of people in diverse cultural and geophysical environments for prospective teachers of preadolescent and early adolescent students. Emphasis is placed on the structure and process of the social studies involving all the social science disciplines. Specific attention is given to developing a social studies curriculum, establishing objectives, planning units, developing a general teaching model, evaluating behavioral changes, and selecting and utilizing teaching materials, specialized equipment, and resources.

450 Science Curriculum, Methods, and Materials for Elementary Education (2)
This course provides a study of curricular trends, the structure of science education, and techniques of instruction. Emphasis is placed on process skills, group instruction, individualized learning through interest centers, development of natural and human field resources, and evaluation and integration of science concepts and skills into the total learning environment for young children. Required for elementary education licensure. Offered in the spring as part of the block prior to student teaching.

453 Effective Teaching Strategies (Secondary and K-12) (3)
A study of the general methods, techniques, practices, instructional materials, and teaching strategies appropriate for secondary, K-12, and vocational teaching. Required for secondary, K-12, and vocational licensure. Offered in the spring as a part of the block prior to student teaching.

454 Student Teaching Seminar (3)
A series of seminars and workshops on such topics as problem solving, classroom management, substance abuse, legal matters, professional ethics, and other issues pertinent to the needs of student teachers. Offered in the fall and spring.

455 Educational Technology Foundations (3)
This course provides a study of the foundations and application of technology in the educational setting both as an instructional tool for students and as a professional tool for educators. A lab component is part of the course. Offered in the fall.

456 Practicum (Elementary Education and Middle Grades) (3)
The practicum is a 150-hour field experience taken during the fall semester of the senior year by all K-9 majors in conjunction with methods courses. Students observe, assist, and carry out instruction in a public school classroom under the supervision of cooperating teachers and education faculty members. Offered in the fall.

457 Student Teaching (Elementary and Middle Grades) (6)
Student teaching is a ten-week full-time experience designed for the spring of the senior year. The student teacher observes, assists, and ultimately takes charge of regularly scheduled classes in a school. Members of the Professional Education faculty and cooperating teachers supervise and evaluate the student teacher. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, including 2.5 cumulative GPA, required Praxis I scores, and grades of C or better in all professional education courses one semester prior to student teaching.

458 Student Teaching (Secondary, K-12, and Vocational) (6)
Student teaching is conducted on a full-time basis for the final ten weeks of the second semester of the senior year. The student teacher observes, assists, and ultimately assumes charge of regularly scheduled classes in a school. Each student teacher participates in planning and evaluative sessions with the education faculty and others concerned. Members of the Professional Education faculty, subject matter specialists, and cooperating teachers work together in the assignment and supervision of the student teacher. Prerequisites: Grades of C or better in all professional educational courses (including the major), a GPA of 2.5 or better, and admission to the student teaching phase of the teacher education program. One semester prior to student teaching.

502 The Middle School (3)
This course is designed to provide middle grades majors with the opportunity to study and discuss the middle school concept and its implications for teachers. The topics addressed include the history and rationale underlying middle and junior high schools; the various organizational patterns employed; collaboration with colleagues, administrators, and support personnel; adviser-advisee programs; exploratory experiences; working with special needs students; parent involvement; and utilizing community resources. Seniors and A-Plus-Masters’ students take this course as one of the block courses that precedes student teaching. Offered in spring only.
 

Return

Campbell University, P.O. Box 488 Buies Creek, NC 27506, 1-800-334-4111