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History and Geography

History | Pre-Law | International Studies
Social Sciences (Concentration in History )
Geography Course Listing | History Course Listing

Associate Professors: Dr. Martin (Government, History, and Justice Department Chair), Dr. Johnson (Director of Historical Studies), Dr. McNair, Dr. Platt

Assistant Professor: Dr. Stanke

Adjunct Professors: Dr. Barge, Dr. Faulkner, Ms. Davis, Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Melvin, Dr. Mercogliano, Mr. Nathaniel, Mr. Slattery, Mr. Tuck

Requirements for a Major in History (CIP 54.0101)
Candidates for the major in History must, in addition to the general curriculum, complete at least 37 semester hours in history with a "C" average or better, to include History 111-112, History 221-222, History 444, History 451, and at least six credit hours of upper-division (300 and 400) courses in each of the following three areas: European history; United States history; and Non-Western history. Candidates must, in addition, complete the following related courses: Government 229, Economics 223 and 224 (American Economic History may be substituted for the latter), and Geography 114. History majors should fulfill the college mathematics requirement by taking Mathematics 111 and Mathematics 160.

Requirements for a Minor in History
Students pursuing a minor in history must select a focus and complete, with a "C" average or better, a minimum of 24 semester hours of history courses, including History 111, 112, 221, and 222. Those pursuing a minor in history must also focus at least 6 semester hours on upper-division (300 and 400 level) courses in one of three areas: U.S. history; European history; Non-Western history.

Pre-law with a Major in History (CIP 54.0101/22.0001) or Government (45.1001/22.0001)
Law schools want students who think rationally and logically, express themselves clearly and coherently in both oral and written form, possess a broad education in the liberal arts, and have specialized in an appropriate academic major. Campbell University's Department of Government, History and Justice has a curriculum to aid students wishing to demonstrate such qualifications.

The program meets all college requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree and gives the students a major in government (political science) or history. The program, which is broad enough to provide students the specific courses needed to prepare them for the study of law, includes 6 hours of United States history, 6 hours of British history, 3 hours of political thought, 3 hours of logic, 6 hours of economics, 3 hours of public speaking, 3 hours of psychology, 6 hours of constitutional development, 6 hours of business and/or accounting classes, and 3 hours of advanced writing. The curriculum also includes Government 300, Introduction to Law, which is taught by faculty from the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law. To meet the foreign language requirement, pre-law students, though not required, are encouraged to take Latin.

International Studies with a Major in History (CIP 54.0101/45.0901)
or Government (CIP 45.1001/45.0901)
The program in International Studies adapts the government major by requiring more of the required 37 semester hours of government of history course focus on international relations. International Studies students are required to take Geography 113 or 114, Government 343, Government 345, Government/History 403, one of the Government/History 443, 445, 446, or 447 series, Government/History 448, Government/History 449 or 450, Religion 251, and Sociology 345. The students should advance through the 221/222 level of a foreign language and include an economics class in addition to the two required for the government major. Government and History majors with an International Studies concentration will respectively complete Government 481 or History 451 as their senior seminar.

Requirements for a B.S. with a Major in the Social Sciences (Concentration in History) (CIP 45.0101)
The candidate must complete, with a "C" average or better, at least 48 semester hours in the social sciences distributed as follows: twenty-four hours in history; six hours each in economics, sociology, geography, and government. In addition to History 111, 112, 221, and 222, the 24 hours of history must include at least 12 semester hours of upper-division (300 and 400 level) courses with at least 3 hours in each of the following areas: U.S. history; European history; Non-Western history.

Requirements for Teacher Licensure in Social Studies (CIP 13.1318)
Students majoring in either history or the social sciences (history) who desire licensure to teach social studies in the secondary schools of North Carolina must complete, with a "C" average or better, at least twenty-four semester hours in history and 6 semester hours each in economics, geography, government and sociology. For the specific courses required, the candidate seeking licensure should consult both the appropriate departmental bulletins and the School of Education. All prospective teachers must possess a 2.5 average overall in order to be admitted into the teacher education program, where they will complete School of Education requirements for licensure.

Double Major
Along with guidelines set forth in this catalogue in the Chapter entitled "Academic Program and Regulations", students wanting to pursue two majors must choose a "governing" major and meet the additional requirements of: (1) maintaining a 3.0 average and (2) taking the Seminar for the "governing" major, and (3) possibly an additional seminar depending on the adopted curriculum (See your adviser).

Geography Course Listing (GEOG 000)

113 Introduction to Geography (3)
A survey of the natural landscape and the forces acting upon it. The course provides an introduction to geological and meteorological processes affecting the earth, as well as addressing the political, economic, and social changes influenced by geographic movements.

114 World Regional Geography (3)
The basic objective of this course is to analyze various world regions with respect to the influence of physical and cultural environments in both spatial and temporal contexts.

History Course Listing (HIST 000)

111, 112 Western Civilization (3,3)
This survey of Western Civilization from ancient times to the present gives attention to the origins of civilization and relations between the Western and non-Western areas of the world.

Hon 211, 212 (3,3)
Honors 211 and 212 will introduce the history of Western thought and civilization to Honors Program students through original works (in modern translation). These courses will also emphasize the development of Christianity within the history of Western culture and thought. Honors 211 and 212 will have a historical framework, but will also give consideration to developments in the arts and sciences as well. Honors courses, when taught through this department, may, at the discretion of the chairman, substitute for courses of substantial equivalency.

221, 222 United States History (3,3)
With special attention to the development of national politics and governmental institutions, the growth of the nation's economy, the American diplomatic tradition, and the evolution of American society, this course surveys United States history from the early American pre-colonial period to the present. Prerequisites: History 111-112.

230 Sports History (3) (Exer230)
The history and development of American sports programs and events from early America through the current period. Prerequisites: History 111-112.

300 Introduction to Law (3) (Govt 300, Crim 300))
An introduction and survey of the field of law for students interested in understanding the diverse nature of the field of legal studies. Prerequisites: Government 229, 230, and junior status.

305 World Civilization I (3)
An introduction to the historical development of World Civilization from its pre-history and ancient beginnings to the early modern age. This class is not a substitute for Western Civilization but counts as a Non-Western class. Prerequisites: History 111-112; History 221-222 are recommended.

306 World Civilization II (3) (Govt 306)
An introduction to the historical development of World Civilization from the Scientific Revolution to 2001. This class is not a substitute for Western Civilization but counts as a Non-Western class. Prerequisites: History 111-112; History 221-222 are recommended.

310 The American Military Experience (3) (MSci 310)
This survey of American warfare and military institutions gives particular emphasis to grand strategy, theater-level operations, civil-military relations, technological development, military leadership, and the impact of war on American society. Prerequisites: History 111-112; History 221-222 recommended.

315 The Cold War (3) (Govt 315)
An introduction to the Cold War era in 20th century East-West diplomatic history, with emphasis on the period 1945-1991. Prerequisites: Government 229, History 112.

322 Latin America: An Area Study (3) (Govt 322)
An historical survey of the selected Latin American nations through the 20th century, the course will emphasize the national period and the intellectual, political, social, international, and economic facets of contemporary Latin America. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 112.

323 The Presidency (3) (Govt 323)
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of the United States Presidency. Prerequisite: Government 229.

324 Congress (3) (Govt 324)
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of the United States Congress. Prerequisite: Government 229.

325 Modern Germany (3)
A historical survey of early and modern Germany; emphasis will be placed on changes with regard to culture, economy, society, and political systems. Prerequisites: History 111-112.

331 History of North Carolina (3)
With an eye to meeting the special needs of those seeking teacher certification, this course surveys the state's political and economic history from the earliest colonial beginnings to the present. Prerequisites: History 221 or 222.

332 North Carolina: Its Geography and People (3)
With an eye toward meeting the special needs of those seeking teacher certification, this course examines in depth the geography and social history of North Carolina. Prerequisites: History 221or 222.

334 American Christianity (3) (Relg 334)
A study of the history, ideas, and influences of Christianity in America. Prerequisites: History 221-222.

335 Congress and the Presidency (3) (Govt 335)
This course analyzes two of the major branches of our national government in terms of their structure, motivations, and processes, placing them within the context of the American political system. Prerequisite: Government 229.

336 General Church History (3) (Relg 336)
Historical study of the major movements and ideas in the church. Prerequisites: History 111-112.

340 Ancient Greece and Rome (3)
A survey of ancient Greece and Rome and their great traditions of democracy, monarchy, philosophy, art, architecture and drama. Students analyze the development of Greek civilization, from the rise of the city-state system, the golden age of Athens and Sparta, concluding with the Greek Empire created by Alexander the Great. Students also address the formation of the Roman Republic, its conquest of Mediterranean world, its ultimate collapse and the rise of the Roman Empire. Prerequisites: History 111-112.

342 Eastern Europe: An Area Study (3) (Govt 342)
A survey of both the recent history, culture, and politics and the political institutions and processes of Eastern Europe and the Soviet successor states. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

343 Medieval England (3)
This survey of the history of the British Isles from the earliest times to around A.D.1307 gives particular emphasis to English constitutional history from 500 to 1307. Prerequisites: History 111-112.

344 Stuart England (3)
This survey of English history during the time of the Stuarts (1603-1714) emphasizes the constitutional struggles of that period. Prerequisites: History 111-112.

350 Renaissance and Reformation (3)
A survey of these two movements that dramatically altered the course of Western History and mark the transition from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period. Students analyze the intellectual history of these movements, as well as the political and economic changes of the age, and the tremendous religious upheavals of the sixteenth century. Prerequisites: History 111-112.

351 South Asia: An Area Study (3) (Govt 351)
An introductory survey of the recent history, culture, and political institutions of South Asia from Afghanistan to Burma, with particular emphasis on India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Attention will also be devoted to Indian and Muslim influences on Southeast Asia. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

352 East Asia: Area Study (3) (Govt 352)
An introductory survey of the recent history of the culture, society, politics, and intellectual development of East Asia, with particular emphasis on the cultural heritage and contemporary issues of China and Japan. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

353 Africa: An Area Study (3) (Govt 353)
A survey of the history of sub-Saharan Africa from the earliest times to the present. Emphasis will be on the period from the mid-19th century to the present, with a special focus on current economic, social, and political problems. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

354 Southeast Asia: An Area Study (3) (Govt 354)
An introductory survey of the recent history, culture, and political institutions of Southeast Asia. Imperialism and twentieth century conflicts will receive particular attention. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

357 The Middle East and North Africa: An Area Study (3) (Govt 357)
An introductory survey of the recent history, culture, and political institutions of this predominantly Islamic area. Particular emphasis will be placed on those political developments since the mid-19th century that help explain the current problems of the countries in this area. Topics to be covered include the Arab-Israeli conflict, oil and the Persian Gulf, the Lebanese civil war, and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

359 The Colonial and Revolutionary Periods in American History (3)
Beginning with the voyages of discovery and ending with the Battle of New Orleans, this course emphasizes the development of political, economic, and social institutions as well as the changes that took place during the Colonial and Revolutionary periods. Prerequisite: History 221.

362 The Old South (3)
This course examines the social, economic, and political history of the South from colonial settlements through the end of the Civil War. Prerequisite: History 221.

363 The Civil War (3)
This course examines the Civil War - Reconstruction period from political, social and economic perspectives. Prerequisite: History 221.

364 The New South (3)
A survey of the economic, social, and political development of the Southern United States since 1870. Prerequisites: History 221-222.

400 Early Modern Europe—1648 to 1815 (3)
A survey of European History from the Treaty of Westphalia to the end of the Napoleonic era, with special attention paid to the major developments of the time, including the Revolution in England, Louis XIV, Old Regime Europe, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the rise and fall of Napoleon. Prerequisites: History 111 - 112.

402 American Economic History (3) (Govt 402)
This course traces the evolution of the economy of the United States, which it analyzes in terms of developments in agriculture, commerce, and industry, with particular emphasis on technology and the changing role of government. Special attention is given to the rise of modern corporations. Prerequisites: History 221-222.

403 History of Politics of International Economic Relations (3) (Govt 403)
This course will investigate at the international level the interaction of political and economic factors in the creation and distribution of wealth and power. Adopting a historical approach, the course will examine the forces and trends involved in the emergence of today’s global political economy and then turn to current issues, including production, trade and protectionism, monetary and financial relations, and problems of economic development and environmental degradation. Prerequisites: History 112 and Government 345.

420 History of American Intelligence (3) (Govt 420)
This course will have students understand intelligence as it relates to American interests and national security. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 222.

433 The United States in the 19th Century (3)
This colloquium reviews the 19th century sectional crisis, the continuity of the nation's 19th-century development, the period from the Age of Jackson to the Populist Revolt. Prerequisite: History 221-222.

434 The United States in the 20th Century (3)
This colloquium will examine the period from Progressivism to the Great Society, and will consider topics selected from the principal economic, social, and political developments that have shaped the history of the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisites: History 221-222.

441 Western European Area Study (3)
A survey of the recent history, culture, and politics of Western Europe. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

442 Organizational Theory and Behavior (Govt 442)
This course enables students to increase their understanding of how organizations can more effectively meet their objectives. Several major concepts will be examined, clarifying how organizations work and what alternative organizational strategies and structures exist. The concepts of power, resource allocation, work environment, and goals will be closely examined. Prerequisite: Government 338 or 340.

443 Medieval Political Thought (3) (Govt 443, Phil 443)
A survey of the major political thinkers of the medieval period, this course focuses on the Christian writers of Western Europe, including St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Marsilius of Padua, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. There will be some analysis of Muslim and Jewish thinkers, as well. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111.

444 Modern Europe (3)
A survey of the recent history, culture, and politics of Twentieth Century Europe from the First World War to the end of the Cold War and the collapse of communism. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112 (is to be taken prior to the seminar in History, History 451).

445 Modern European Political Thought (3) (Govt 445, Phil 445)
The main currents of European political thought are analyzed in terms of their historical setting and philosophical background. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 112.

446 American Political Thought (3) (Govt 446)
The main currents of American political thought, from colonial beginnings to the present, are analyzed in terms of their historical and philosophical background. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

447 Ancient Political Thought (3) (Govt 447 and Phil 447)
A survey of the political writings of Plato and Aristotle, this course focuses on analyses and evaluations of political ideas as well as their historical settings. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111.

448 American Foreign Policy in the Twentieth Century (3) (Govt 448)
This course examines origins, formulation, and implementation of American foreign policy in the 20th century. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 222.

449-450 The Development of the American Constitution (3,3) (Govt 449-450)
This account of the living Constitution traces practices, customs, traditions, and fundamental legal ideas in their historic setting as they make up the body of American constitutionalism today. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 221 or 222, as appropriate.

451 Seminar: Historiography and Historical Writing (4)
The course combines readings from several well-known modern historians with research, writing, and extensive criticism of papers produced by members of the seminar. Required of all history majors. (Approval of the instructor is required, plus History 111-112 and 444.)

453 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (1.5)
A study of the methods of teaching social studies in the secondary school, this course places emphasis on the practical development of useful teaching materials. (Restricted to students seeking North Carolina teaching licensure.)

454 Internship (3) (Govt 454, Crim 454)
The internship program is a supervised work experience with selected public or private agencies, museums, archives, or similar institutions and activities with a historical purpose. (Approval of the instructor is required.)

459 Contemporary Issues and Conferences (1-3) (Govt 459)
This course is designed to encourage student participation in such programs as the Model United Nations and other intercollegiate conference activities and special programs of study. A student must secure the permission of the instructor in order to enroll in Government/History 459.

460 Special Topics (3)
Special Topics is a tutorial course established at the request of the student and an agreement with a faculty member when special needs or circumstances require presentation of subject matter not otherwise included in the academic program. (By arrangement with the instructor).

 

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