Online Catalog

General Information

Undergraduate Academic Policies

Financial Information

Department and Course Descriptions

Table of Contents

 

 

Government and Criminal Justice

Government | Pre-Law | Public Administration/Public Policy | International Studies | Criminal Justice Administration | Social Sciences (Concentration in Government) | Government Course Listing | Criminal Justice Administration Course Listing

Associate Professors:, Dr. Thornton (Director of Government Studies), Dr. Schroeder, Dr.  King, Dr. Gay (Director of Criminal Justice)

Instructor:  Ms. Cowling

Adjunct Professors:  Mr. Combs, Mr. Cain, Mrs. Wood,  Mr. Slattery,  Dean Whichard, Mr. Woodlief

Requirements for a Major in Government (CIP 45.1001)
Candidates for a major in government must complete with a "C" average or better, at least 37 hours in government courses. Included in the 37 hours must be Government 260, at least three hours in public policy and administration (Government 334, 336, 337, 338, or 340), three hours in international studies (Government 343, Government 345, Government/History 403, or Government /History 448), three hours in political theory (Government/History 443, 445, 446, or 447), three hours of constitutional development (Government/History 449 or 450), and the four hour senior seminar (Government 451, 461, 471, 481).

Requirements for a Minor in Government
Students pursuing a minor in government must complete, with a "C" average or better, 24 semester hours of government courses, including Government 229, Government 230, and one course from at least three of the following four areas: public policy and administration; international studies; political thought; or constitutional development.

Pre-law with a Major in Government (45.1001/22.0001) or History (CIP 54.0101/22.0001)
Law schools want students who think rationally and logically, express themselves clearly and coherently in both oral and written form, possess a broad education in the liberal arts, and have specialized in an appropriate academic major. Campbell University's Department of Government, History and Justice has a curriculum to aid students wishing to demonstrate such qualifications.

The program meets all college requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree and gives the students a major in government (political science) or history. The program, which is broad enough to provide students the specific courses needed to prepare them for the study of law, includes 6 hours of United States history, 6 hours of British history, 3 hours of political thought, 3 hours of logic, 6 hours of economics, 3 hours of public speaking, 3 hours of psychology, 6 hours of constitutional development, 6 hours of business and/or accounting classes, and 3 hours of advanced writing. The curriculum also includes Government 300, Introduction to Law, which is taught by faculty from the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law. To meet the foreign language requirement, pre-law students, though not required, are encouraged to take Latin.


Public Administration/Public Policy with a Major in Government (CIP 45.1001/44.0401)
The concentration in Public Administration/Public Policy is designed for those Government majors interested in pursuing graduate degrees in public administration and/or public policy, with the ultimate goal of  working in either the public or non-profit sectors. The Government major takes the majority of the required 37 semester hours of government courses in public administration and policy related courses. These include Internship (Government 454) and Senior Seminar (Government 481). In addition, the Public Administration/Public Policy student is required to take the following government courses:  Public Budgeting (Government 334), Municipal Government (Government 337), Introduction to Public Administration (Government 338), Introduction to Public Policy (Government 340), and Ethics in Government (Government 339). Additional required non-government courses include Principles of Management (Business Administration 331), Human Resources (Business Administration 332), Introduction to Mass Communication (Communication 200) or Introduction to Public Relations (Communication  211), Principles of Sociology (Sociology 225) or Social Problems (Sociology 226), and Theater 115. Other strongly suggested government courses include The Presidency (Government 323), Congress (Government 324), Organization Theory and Behavior (Government/History  442), Constitutional Law I (Government 449), and Constitutional Law II (Government 450).

In ternational Studies with a Major in Government (CIP 45.1001/45.0901) or History (CIP 54.0101/45.0901)
The program in International Studies adapts the government major by requiring more of the required 37 semester hours of government of history course focus on international relations. International Studies students are required to take Geography 113 or 114, Government 343, Government 345, Government/History 403, one of the Government/History 443, 445, 446, or 447 series, Government/History 448, Government/History 449 or 450, Religion 251, and Sociology 345. The students should advance through the 221/222 level of a foreign language and include an economics class in addition to the two required for the government major. Government majors with an International Studies concentration  will complete Government 471 or 481 as their senior seminar, while History majors will complete History 451.

Requirements for a B.A. in Criminal Justice Administration (CIP 43.0103)
Students who wish to acquire a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Criminal Justice Administration must, in addition to the General College Curriculum, complete the following courses with a "C" average or better: CRIM 231, 232, 272, 280, 339, 360, 361, 362, 430, 440, 454, 481, and 3 hours of Criminal Justice electives from any of the following courses: CRIM 300, 310, 315, 420, 458, 470, or 475.  Additionally, students must complete GOVT 229, 230, and 260; HIST 221 and 222; THEA 115; ECON 202; and 12 hours of electives.  Criminal Justice majors are strongly encouraged to use their elective hours to select a minor or other concentration that is complementary to the field in which they wish to work. Electives should be selected in consultation with their adviser.

Requirements for a Minor in Criminal Justice Administration
Students who wish to minor in Criminal Justice Administration must complete the following courses with a "C" average or better: CRIM 231, 232, 270, 280, and 440, as well as GOVT 229.  Additionally, students must complete 9 hours of electives from any of the following courses: CRIM 300, 310,  315, 339, 360, 361, 362, 420, 430, 470, or 475.

Requirements for a B.S. with a Major in Social Sciences (Concentration in Government) (CIP 45.0101)
Candidates must complete, with a "C" average or better, at least 54 semester hours in the social sciences distributed as follows: 24 hours in government; 12 hours of history (111-112, 221-222); and six hours each in economics, geography, and sociology. Those government courses must include Government 229, Government 230, and one course each in three of the four following areas: public policy and administration, international studies, political thought, or constitutional development.

Requirements for a B.S. with a Major in Social Sciences (Concentration in Criminal Justice Administration) (CIP 45.0103)
Candidates must complete with a "C" average or better, at least 54 semester hours in the social sciences.  These will include including Criminal Justice 231, 232, 270, 280, and  440.  Additionally, students must complete 9 hours of electives from any of the following classes: Criminal Justice 310, 315, 360, 361, 362, 420, 430, 470, and 475.   The student must complete 12 hours of history (111-112, 221-22) and six hours each in government (229 and another Government class), economics (223-224), and sociology (225 and a sociology elective).

Requirements for Teaching Licensure in Social Studies (CIP 13.1318)
Students majoring in Social Sciences (Concentration in Government) who desire licensure to teach social studies in North Carolina secondary schools must complete, with a "C" average or better, at least 24 semester hours in government, 12 semester hours in history, and 6 semester hours each in economics, geography, and sociology. All prospective teachers must possess a 2.5 average overall in order to be admitted to the teacher education program where they will complete the School of Education requirements for licensure.

Double Major
Along with guidelines set forth in this catalog in the Chapter entitled "Academic Programs and Regulations", students wanting to pursue two majors must choose a "governing" major and meet the additional requirements of: (1) maintaining a 3.0 average and (2) taking the Seminar for the "governing" major, and possibly an additional seminar depending on the adopted curriculum (See your adviser).

Government Course Listing (GOVT 000)

229 The National Government (3)
This general introduction to the study of American government focuses on the federal level with special attention to the framing of the U.S. Constitution, the general organization and functioning of the national government, the nature of federalism, political parties, elections, and current issues of public policy at the national level. (Prerequisite for most government courses.)

230 State and Local Government (3)
This course gives special attention to federal-state relations and to the workings of state government in policy areas such as taxation, budgeting, and education. The politics of state government are closely examined. Local government is considered, but to a lesser degree. Prerequisite: Government 229.

232 State Legislative Politics (3)
This independent course teaches the legislative process while preparing student-delegates for the convocation of the North Carolina Student Legislature held annually in Raleigh. Students are required to gain a working familiarity with Robert’s Rules of Order, participate in the research and writing of the bill(s) to be introduced at the state meeting, and (for full credit) write a formal policy position paper. (Registration is by approval of the professor.)

260 Scope and Methods of Political Science (3)
An introduction to theory, hypothesis generation, data collection, data analysis, computer usage, and research methods of political science. This course culminates with student preparation of a research project or grant proposal. Prerequisites: Government 229 and Math 160.

300 Introduction to Law (3) (Hist 300, Crim 300)
An introduction and survey of the field of law for students interested in understanding the diverse nature of the field of juris prudence and legal studies. Prerequisites: Government 229, 230, and junior status.

306 World Civilization II (3) (Hist 306)
An introduction to the historical development of World Civilization from the Scientific Revolution to 2001. This class is not a substitute for Western Civilization but counts as a Non Western class. Prerequisite: History 111-112; History 221-222 are recommended.

315 The Cold War (3) (Hist 315)
An introduction to the Cold War era in 20th century East-West diplomatic history, with emphasis on the period 1945-1991. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 112.

322 Latin America: An Area Study (3) (Hist 322)
An historical survey of the society, culture, and politics of the principal Latin American nations in the 20th century. The course will emphasize the national period and the intellectual, political, international, economic, and social course of contemporary Latin American history. Prerequisites: Government 229, History 112.

323 The Presidency (3) (Hist 323)
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of the United States Presidency. Prerequisite: Government 229.

324 Congress (3) (Hist 324)
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of the United States Congress. Prerequisite: Government 229.

334 Public Budgeting (3)
An in-depth study of public finance and budgeting; applications, systems, and impacts. Prerequisites: Government 229 and Government 230.

335 Congress and the Presidency (3) (Hist 335)
This course analyzes two of the major branches of our national government in terms of their structure, motivations, and processes, placing them within the context of the American political system. Prerequisite: Government 229

336 American Political Parties (3)
The main topics considered are the origins and development of American political parties, their functions, organizations, regulations, campaign methods, and conduct of elections. Prerequisite: Government 229.

337 Municipal Government (3)
The history, organization, and administration of American municipal corporations are studied in some detail. Special attention is given to intergovernmental relations and the current concerns of metropolitan governance. Prerequisite: Government 230.

338 Introduction to Public Administration (3)
This course explores philosophies and processes of administration of public and quasi-public organizations as they manifest themselves in the American bureaucratic structure. Detailed attention will be given to identifying those tasks best accomplished by the public sector, the problems of organizing and staffing government agencies, the efforts to keep governmental agencies politically accountable, and the means and mechanisms for implementing governmental decisions. Prerequisites: Government 229 and 230.

339 Ethics in Government (3) (Crim 339)
This course will help students better understand the ethical and moral dilemmas pressed upon government in today’s society. The most notable approaches to ethics, values, and morality in government by prominent theorists in the field will be studied. Important concepts will be examined, such as administrative responsibility, mental attitudes, public interest, personal codes, paradoxes of procedure, and ethical and moral value systems. Prerequisites: Government 229 and 230.

340 Introduction to Public Policy (3)
This course inquires into the nature of the public policy-making process as it reveals itself in the initiation, formulation, and implementation of policy. Students will also analyze and evaluate selected national policies while examining and utilizing various analytical approaches. Prerequisites: Government 229 and 230.

342 Eastern Europe: An Area Study (3) (Hist 342)
A survey of the recent history, culture, politics, and political institutions of Eastern Europe and the Soviet successor states. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

343 Introduction to Comparative Foreign Government (3)
This course introduces students to the recent histories, political cultures, government structures, political processes, and current situations of selected democratic, totalitarian, and developing countries. Prerequisite: Government 229.

345 International Relations (3)
An introduction to politics among nations. Emphasizing the historical development of the international state system, this course focuses on the problems of war, development, and trade in the international system, while also including some attention to international organizations and international law. Prerequisite: Government 229.

351 South Asia: An Area Study (3) (Hist 351)
An introductory survey of the recent history, culture, and political institutions of South Asia from Afghanistan to Burma with particular emphasis on India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Attention will also be devoted to Indian and Muslim influences on Southeast Asia. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

352 East Asia: An Area Study (3) (Hist 352)
An introductory survey of the recent history of the culture, society, politics, and intellectual development of East Asia, with particular emphasis on the cultural heritage and contemporary issues of China and Japan. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

353 Africa: An Area Study (3) (Hist 353)
A survey of the history of sub-Saharan Africa from the earliest times to the present. Emphasis will be on the period from the mid-19th century to the present with a special focus on current economic, social, and political problems. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

354 Southeast Asia: An Area Study (3) (Hist 354)
An introductory survey of the recent history, culture, and political institutions of Southeast Asia. Imperialism and twentieth century conflicts will receive particular attention. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

357 The Middle East and North Africa: An Area Study (3) (Hist 357)
An introductory survey of the recent history, culture, and political institutions of this predominantly Islamic area. Particular emphasis will be placed on those political developments since the mid-19th century that help explain the current problems of the countries in this area. Topics to be covered include the Arab-Israeli conflict, oil and the Persian Gulf, the Lebanese civil war, and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

402 American Economic History (3) (Hist 402)
This course traces the evolution of the economy of the United States, which it analyzes in terms of developments in agriculture, commerce, and industry, with particular emphasis on technology and the changing role of government. Special attention is given to the rise of modern corporations. Prerequisites: History 221- 222.

403 History and Politics of International Economic Relations (3) (Hist 403)
This course will investigate at the international level the interaction of political and economic factors in the creation and distribution of wealth and power. Adopting a historical approach, the course will examine the forces and trends involved in the emergence of today’s global political economy and then turn to current issues, including production, trade and protectionism, monetary and financial relations, and problems of economic development and environmental degradation. Prerequisites: History 112 and Government 345.

420 History of American Intelligence (3) (Hist 420)
This course will have students understand intelligence as it relates to American interests and national security. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 222.

442 Organization Theory and Behavior (3) (Hist 442)
This course enables students to increase their understanding of how organizations can more effectively meet their objectives. Several major concepts will be examined, clarifying how organizations work and what alternative organizational strategies and structures exist. The concepts of power, resource allocation, work environment, and goals will be closely examined. Prerequisite: Government 338 or 340.

443 Medieval Political Thought (3) (Hist 443, Phil 443)
A survey of the major political thinkers of the medieval period, this course focuses on the Christian writers of Western Europe, including St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Marsilius of Padua, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. There is some analysis of Muslim and Jewish thinkers as well. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111.

445 Modern European Political Thought (3) (Hist 445, Phil 445)
This course analyzes the main currents of European political thought in terms of their historical setting and philosophical background. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111-112.

446 American Political Thought (3) (Hist 446)
The main currents of American political thought, from colonial beginnings to the present, are analyzed in terms of their historical setting and philosophical background. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 221-222.

447 Ancient Political Thought (3) (Hist 447, Phil 447)
A survey of the political writings of Plato and Aristotle, this course focuses on analyses and evaluations of political ideas as well as their historical settings. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 111.

448 Twentieth-Century American Foreign Policy (3) (Hist 448)
This course examines the origins, formulation, and implementation of American foreign policy in the 20th century. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 222.

449, 450 The Development of the American Constitution (3, 3) (History 449, 450)
This account of the living Constitution traces practices, customs, traditions, and fundamental legal ideas in their historic setting as they make up the body of American constitutionalism today. Prerequisites: Government 229 and History 221 or 222, as appropriate.

451 Seminar on Constitutional Law (4)
This seminar requires students to make a detailed examination of the Supreme Court’s landmark cases and their implications. Prerequisites: Government 449 or 450 and approval of the instructor.

454 Internship (3) (Hist 454, Crim 454)
An internship is a supervised work experience with selected law firms, public agencies, political campaign, noted public figures and non-profit agencies. Approval of instructor is required.

458 Mock Trials (4) (Hist 458, Crim 458)
This course will provide students with the fundamentals of courtroom proceedings. This will occur in conjunction with the annual Mock Trials case analysis and team development activities.

459 Contemporary Issues and Conferences (1-3) (Hist 459)
This course is designed to encourage student participation in such programs as the Model United Nations, Model Arab League, and other intercollegiate conference activities and special programs of study. A student must secure the permission of the instructor in order to enroll in Government/History 459.

460 Special Topics (3) (Hist 460)
Special Topics is a tutorial course established at the request of the student and faculty member when special needs or circumstances require examination of subject matter not otherwise included in the academic program. (By arrangement with the instructor.)

461 Seminar in Public Administration (4)
This seminar will allow students to integrate concepts and theories they have learned from earlier policy and administration courses as they complete an extensive case of study of some particular governmental policy area. This will include reading several well-known public administration theorists as well as criticism and analysis of research presented to the class. Prerequisites: Government 338 or 340, 441, and Senior status, with permission of the instructor.

471 Seminar in International Studies (4)
An in-depth examination of fundamental questions in international relations. These include causes and effects of armed conflict, both among and within states, the interaction of political and economic factors in shaping the international system, and the tension between economic development and environmental degradation at the global level. Students will write a seminar paper focusing on a selected aspect of these themes. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

481 Seminar in Research and Writing
This seminar serves as the capstone course for students majoring in government, especially those intending to pursue post-graduation opportunities other than law school. Under the active guidance of a faculty director s tudents will conceive, develop, research, and write a substantial piece (40 pages) of scholarly work. Through this process, students will hone skills crucial to success in graduate school or the professional arena, to include: definition of an relevant and feasible research topic, identification and appropriate use of primary and secondary sources of information, effective organization and presentation of ideas and information, development and application of appropriate research methodology, analysis and interpretation of findings, and evaluation of policy implications.  Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Criminal Justice Administration Course Listing (CRIM 000)

FNSC 101 Introduction to Forensic Science (4)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of forensics science.  The use of science and technology to solve crime will be the major thrust of the course.  Major topics emphasized include: crime scene analysis, evidence collection and analysis, and legal issues surrounding forensic science. The laboratory work will explore the science behind evidence analysis.  The course is team-taught by members of the Criminal Justice, Biology, and Chemistry/Physics Departments.  The course qualifies as a General College Curriculum science course.  Forensic science courses with laboratory may be taken to meet the general college curriculum science requirement.  Forensic science courses cannot be taken as biology or chemistry electives.  Prerequisite:  none. 

231 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
This is a survey course designed to acquaint students with institutions and processes of criminal justice – police, courts, and corrections. Prerequisite: None.

232 Introduction to Criminology (3)
This course will provide an in-depth analysis of criminality, including the etiology (origin) of crime, and the extent and nature of crime within American society. The primary theories of criminality will be critiqued. Prerequisite: None.

270 Courts and Procedure (3)
This course is a study of the working and structure of the United States Court System.  Students will study the federal court system as well as the North Carolina court system. Students will study the concepts of jurisdiction and appeals as well as the actual structure of a trial.  Visits will be made to courtrooms within North Carolina.  Prerequisite: None

280 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3)
This survey course will acquaint students with the various historical and operational aspects of the law enforcement process including an analysis of several intractable and endemic problems of policing a free society. Prerequisite: None.

300 Introduction to Law (3) (Govt 300, Hist 300)
An introduction and survey of the field of law for students interested in understanding the diverse nature of the field of juris prudence and legal studies. Prerequisites: Government 229, 230, and junior status.

310 Victimology (3)
This course will examine various issues attending victimology, including, but not limited to: critical issues in the measurement of victimization, victimization characteristics, the victim’s role and experience in the criminal justice system, emerging victim compensation and restitution programs, domestic violence, how to prevent personal victimization, and issues of restorative justice. Contemporary political, philosophical, social, legal, and administrative issues facing victims will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 12 hours of criminal justice courses.

315  Youth at Risk (3)
This course will examine various issues surrounding youth-at-risk. This course will give students a better understanding of certain risk factors and characteristics of youth-at-risk, in addition to, the most significant problems faced by this population. Important concepts to be examined include: parental responsibility, learning disabilities, Internet dangers, peer pressure, school violence, and substance abuse. By the end of the course, students will be able to articulate how these elements play a role in youth becoming “at-risk.”   Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 231 and 232.

339 Ethics in Government (3) (Govt 339)
This course will help students better understand the ethical and moral dilemmas pressed upon governmental employees in today’s society. The most notable approaches to ethics, values, and morality in government and criminal justice by prominent theorists in the field will be studied. Important concepts will be examined, such as administrative responsibility, mental attitudes, public interest, personal codes, paradoxes of procedure, and ethical and moral values systems. Prerequisites: Government 229 and 230.

360 Criminal Justice Administration (3)
This course introduces students to issues involved in criminal justice administration, including organizational theory, awareness of how CJ organizations function within the system, the impact of politics and government on CJ operations, the importance of competent leadership, and the endemic problems of fair and humane treatment in administering justice. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 231.

361 Criminal Law (3)
Students are introduced to constitutional, criminal, and civil law as it is applied to the provision of justice in America. Prerequisites: Criminal Justice 231and Government 229.

362 Juvenile Justice (3)
This course will acquaint students with various theories of delinquency, street gangs, school violence, and the institutional and community-based approaches of dealing with juveniles. Prerequisites: Criminal Justice 231, 232.

420 Criminal Investigation (3)
This course will acquaint the student with the various procedures of basic criminal investigation. The course focuses on the techniques used by all investigators who are called upon to reconstruct major criminal offenses and collect evidence from crime scenes. Some criminalistic and forensic aspects will also be introduced. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 12 hours of criminal justice courses or permission of instructor.

430 Correctional Philosophies and Issues (3)
An in-depth survey of correctional philosophies and issues, including discussion of how philosophies have been translated into policies that favor incarceration. The impact of societal structures, organizations, and beliefs will be discussed in relation to the formulation and execution of correctional philosophies. Prerequisites: Criminal Justice 231 and 360, or permission of instructor.

440 Theory of Justice (3)
This course will give students an understanding of the major endemic controversies surrounding the field of criminal justice. Included will be an in-depth critical analysis of how world-views are formed, what dose a Christian view of justice entail, and how that view of justice differs from both classical or contemporary views of justice. Additionally, various policy developments that focus on particular criminal justice issues will be examined. Prerequisites: Criminal Justice 231 and 232.

454 Internship (3) (Govt 454, Hist 454)
An internship is a supervised work experience with selected law firms, law enforcement agencies, correctional agencies, or non-profit organizations, designed to give students actual experience in a particular area of criminal justice. (Open only to Criminal Justice majors with approval of the professor.)

458 Mock Trials (4) (Govt 458, Hist 458)
This course will provide students with the fundamentals of modern trial advocacy.  This will occur in conjunction with the annual Mock Trials case analysis and team development activities.  (Open to all majors; permission of the instructor required).

460 Independent Study (3)
Independent study of special topics is established at the request of the student and faculty member when special needs or circumstances require examination of subject matter not otherwise included in the academic program. (By arrangement with the instructor).

470 Critical Issues in Criminal Justice (3)
The focus of this course varies from year to year, but selected topics will address endemic and/or emerging issues related to criminal justice. The course will allow students to extensively study and critically analyze a topic of high interest related to the field of criminal justice and justice administration. Examples of focus topics include, but are not limited to, are police tactics, domestic violence, the media and violence, serial killers, criminal profiling, community-oriented policing, private security, race and crime, critical issues in policing, and organized crime. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 12 hours of criminal justice courses or permission of instructor. Student may take this course twice for a total of 6 hours toward graduation.

475  Terrorism (3)
This course examines terrorism and the response of the American government and society to this threat (i.e., counterterrorism).  Students will explore broad themes and topics relevant to terrorist attacks, including but not limited to:  defining terrorism, historical terrorism, religious terrorism, domestic terrorism, terrorist motives, strategies, & organizations, use of weapons of mass destruction, strategies for combating terrorism, intelligence issues, threat assessment, and anti-terrorism awareness training.  The goal of the course is to develop a shared understanding of the complexity of terrorism and to develop an intellectual framework that can assist in understanding this critical subject.  Prerequisite:  junior or senior status or permission of instructor.

481 Seminar in Criminal Justice (4)
This is a capstone course that requires seniors to use theoretical perspectives from criminology and other criminal justice-related areas to formulate a policy-related question pertaining to the study of crime, criminality, and responses to crime and criminality. The student will develop a research topic, develop and administer a survey instrument, collect and analyze data, and prepare an executive summary paper and PowerPoint presentation to report the findings of their research. Skills and concepts developed in previous classes form the foundation for this course. Prerequisites: Criminal Justice 231, 232, 440, Government 260 and Senior Status.

 

Return

Campbell University, P.O. Box 488 Buies Creek, NC 27506, 1-800-334-4111