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Exercise Science

Exercise Science and the General College Curriculum
Athletic Training | Exercise and Sport Science
Fitness Wellness Management | Kinesiology | Physical Education
 Sport Management Major
Exercise Science Course Listing

Professor: Dr. Freeman (Chair), Dr. Woolard

Associate Professors: Dr. Bergemann

Assistant Professor: Ms. Watkins

Instructors: Ms. Weiss

Adjuncts: Ms. Ellis, Dr. McCormick

Exercise Science and the General College Curriculum

The Department offers a diverse selection of activity courses as well as teaching-, science- and business-oriented major programs to prepare students for work in the sport, fitness, and wellness fields. Each major program includes cognate courses in other departments and offers on-site work experiences as part of the program.

All non-majors must take PE 185 and 1 semester hour of activity courses (PE 111 or 112) to meet their General College requirement. All students in PE 185 classes must wear the designated uniform and shoes appropriate to the activity. Uniforms may be purchased at the bookstore.

PE 185 Lifetime Wellness (2)
Required of all non-majors. Guides the student in leading a healthier life. Classroom lectures cover topics that include nutrition, the relationship between fitness and wellness, cardiovascular disease risk management, cancer risk management, stress management techniques, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases, smoking cessation, cardiovascular assessment and exercise prescription, body composition assessment and weight control, and other relevant wellness and fitness issues. Lectures are supplemented by laboratory and exercise activities. Prerequisite: A completed physical examination on file at the Student Health Service.

PE 111-112 Elective Activity Courses (1)
One semester hour required of all non-majors. Emphasis on developing skills to enjoy and gain health benefits from the activity. The following activities are offered at the beginning level, and some are offered at the intermediate and/or advanced levels. New courses will be added to reflect student interests. Lab fees may be charged for some courses.

Aerobic Dance, Badminton, Dance (Aerobic, Social, Square), Golf, Jogging, Lifeguard Training, Scuba Diving, Self Defense, Skiing, Softball, Strength Training, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball, Walking Fitness, and Water Safety Instructor.

Any individual unable to participate successfully in either a walking program or a jogging/walking program may meet the General College physical education requirement by taking EXER 202. The request for this exception is made through the University Student Health Service to the Department Chair.

Department & Course Descriptions Majors in the Exercise Science Curriculum

Athletic Training
Exercise and Sport Science
Fitness Wellness Management
Kinesiology
Physical Education
Sport Management

The Department has printed copies of the course requirements and details of each major program. It is available at Carter Gym, Room 100. The summarized course requirements for each program are as follows:

Athletic Training Major (CIP 51.0913)
EXER 201, 221, 252, 312, 313, 314, 321, 326, 355, 391a-f, 412, 425, 426, 427, 432, 433.

Exercise and Sport Science Major (CIP 31.0501)
EXER 131, 201, 202, 221, 321, 324 or 425, 325 or 426, 421, 431, 432, 492,  6 s.h. EXER electives at 200-level or higher. Cognate: 18 hours in another field (Business or Science recommended. See your adviser).

Fitness Wellness Management Major (CIP 31.0599)
EXER 131 or 185 & 111/112; 201, 202, 221, 311, 321, 326, 338, 425, 426, 431, 432, 450, 452, 461, 492. Cognate: ACCT 213; BADM 221 or EXER 264, BADM 313, 331, 332; ECON 201; PSYC 232. Recommended: EXER 494.

Kinesiology Major (CIP 31.0505)
EXER 201, 221, 321, 326, 333, 421, 425, 426, 431, 432, 450, 452, 461, 492. Cognate: CHEM 111, 113; PHYS 221, 222; PSYC 232. Recommended: MATH 122, EXER 494.

Physical Education Major (CIP 31.1314)
EXER 131, 132, 201, 202, 221, 311, 324, 325, 331, 333, 338, 339, 431, 432, 441; EDUC 221, 385; PSYC 260. Teacher Licensure Option: EDUC 431, 432, 441, 453, 454, 458. See adviser for other requirements.

Sport Management Major (CIP 31.0504)
EXER 201, 221, 230, 321, 325 or 426, 336, 421, 431, 432, 461, 462, 6 s.h. EXER electives at 200-level or higher. Cognate: ACCT 213; BADM 221 or EXER 264, BADM 313, 331, 332; ECON 201; THEA 115; PSYC 232.

Minor in Sport Business Program Requirements:
EXER 201, 230, 431, 461, 462.

Exercise Science Course Listing (EXER 000)

131 Fitness for Majors (3)
Classroom lectures cover topics that include nutrition, the relationship between fitness and wellness, cardiovascular disease risk management, stress management techniques, cardiovascular assessment and exercise prescription, body composition assessment and weight control, and other relevant wellness and fitness issues. Lectures are supplemented by laboratory and exercise activities (stretching, weight training, walk/jog, dance exercise, swimming, cycling, racquet sports, e.g., tennis, badminton, racquetball, and outdoor activities). A swimming test must be passed as part of the course requirement. Prerequisite: A completed physical examination on file at the Student Health Service. For majors only.

132 Sport Skills and Principles (3)
Develops skill competence and understanding of a variety of sports, e.g., tumbling, volleyball, basketball, soccer, track and field, and softball. Students develop an understanding of the principles of teaching sport and activity skills. Skill progressions, drills, and effective teaching techniques are presented. Prerequisite: A completed physical examination on file at the Student Health Service. For majors only.

EXER 131-132 are laboratory courses for physical education majors, with an emphasis on performance skill development. The instructors will integrate teaching progressions into the acquisition of skills. Classes meet six hours per week for the semester.

201 Foundations of Exercise Science (3)
An introduction to the Departmentís major courses of study. Overview of the professional areas of exercise science, physical education and sport, emphasizing historical, philosophical, and socio-psychological foundations and their implications for contemporary society. Includes the study of current issues, problems, ethical concerns, careers, and future directions of the field.

202 Lifetime Health (3)
Emphasis on the impact of personal health, fitness, and wellness in everyday lives within the school and community by participating in the proper exercise and nutritional programs. For majors only.

221 Computer Applications in the Exercise Sciences (3)
Introduces the application of technology in the practice and management of human fitness, wellness, and sport. Demonstrates the uses and value of types of hardware and software. Gives hands-on experience in using a variety of software applications, including word processing, spreadsheets, database operations, and major-specific software. For majors only.

224 First Aid and CPR (2)
The basic principles of first aid and the practical use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation when cardiac arrest is encountered. Students are certified for the one and two person procedure and reviving an infant. Includes proper use of the Heimlich maneuver for victims of choking. For majors and lifeguard trainees only.

230 History of American Sport (3)
Surveys the development of American sport from colonial times to the present day. Topics include the influence of the shift from an agrarian to an urban society, the search for the American character, the Olympic Games (ancient and modern), the end of amateurism in sport, sport as politics, the drug crisis, the impact of technology on sport, and the shift to the professional marketing and entertainment model by the end of the 20th century. Cross-listed as HIST 230. Counts as Social Science elective. Offered in even years (2006, 2008), Spring. Prerequisite: HIST 111-112.

241-247 Theory of Coaching (2)
Methods and materials of seasonal planning, training, officiating, and game strategy in each sport. Offered on request.

241 Baseball
243 Basketball
244 Soccer
245 Softball
246 Track and Field
247 Volleyball

251 Sports Officiating (2)
Principles and practices of officiating in major sports.  Intramural sports used as a lab experiences.

252 Introduction to Athletic Training (3)
Provides an introduction to the concepts, skills, and techniques used in the prevention and care of common athletic injuries.  An emphasis on developing problem solving skills that will foster the ability of students to learn the signs and symptoms of common athletic injuries and be able to apply emergency first aid care while following administrative procedures. Corequisite/prerequisite: BIOL 221.

264 Sports Law (3)
A review of the various sports law issues facing professional, intercollegiate, Olympic, high school, youth, and adult recreational sports. Major topics include tort liability, contracts/waivers, antitrust law, labor law, constitutional law, gender discrimination, drug testing, intellectual property law, broadcasting law, laws pertaining to sports agents, business and employment law, internet gambling, and athletes with disabilities.

311 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3)
Provides a basic introduction to the concepts, skills, and techniques used in the prevention and care of common athletic injuries. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

312 Lower Extremity Evaluation and Assessment (3)
Theory and practice combine to provide a realistic approach to orthopedic joint evaluation and assessment. Lower extremity joints are investigated. Provides information needed to recognize, test, and assess orthopedic conditions. Students should have a working knowledge of anatomy. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

313 Upper Extremity Evaluation and Assessment (3)
Theory and practice combine to provide a realistic approach to orthopedic joint evaluation and assessment of the upper extremity joints, including the abdomen and thorax. Provides information needed to recognize, test, and assess orthopedic conditions. Students will be expected to have a working knowledge of anatomy. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

314 Therapeutic Exercise (3)
Discusses the principles and techniques of rehabilitation, conditioning, and the return of individuals to sport. The therapeutic techniques will encompass scientific/physiological rationales, selection criteria, indications/contraindications, and clinical applications. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

321 Sport and Exercise Nutrition (3)
This course covers the principles of sound nutrition for the exercising individual, the athlete, and the average individual in society. The physiological needs of the human body; the way that foods, vitamins, enzymes, and minerals are used; and the false information concerning nutrition, diet, weight loss, and enhancing human performance will be discussed.

324 Applied Exercise Physiology (3)
This course studies the response and adaptation of the body to exercise, focusing on basic application to teaching, coaching, and non-specialist. It includes the effects of diet, environmental conditions, and gender. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

325 Applied Biomechanics (3)
This course examines the mechanical principles underlying human movement. It is designed to give a non-mathematical, applied introduction to the analysis of sport skills for non-specialists. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

326 Anatomical Kinesiology and Muscle Function (3)
This is a functional anatomy course that studies the human body's ability to move. The focus is on the skeletal, muscular, neuromotor control, structural, and functional aspects of human motion.  Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

331 Motor Development (3)
An investigation of motor development as an important component of the foundation needed to understand human behavior as it relates to teaching, learning and performing motor skills. The course explains the motor development process and its impact on the acquisition and refinement of physical skills. Offered even years (2006, 2008), Fall.

333 Motor Learning (3)
An investigation of motor learning as an important component of the foundation needed to understand human behavior as it relates to teaching, learning, and performing motor skills. The course explains the process by which humans acquire and refine physical skills, as well as the stages of skill learning and development. Offered odd years (2005, 2007), Fall.

334 Elementary School Physical Education and Health Methods (3)
An investigation of the principles, practices, and procedures of teaching physical education in the elementary school with emphasis on curriculum development and methods and materials involved in teaching. For elementary education majors only.

335 Introduction to Athletic Administration (3)
An investigation of the administration of sports programs at the high school and college levels. Topics include governance structures, facility management, human relations, staff motivation, legal liability, scheduling, staffing program development, and other aspects of athletic management for physical educators, coaches, and athletic directors.

336 Sport Coaching Principles (3)
Basic principles of coaching youth sports from the elementary grades through the high school level. Includes an overview of philosophy and ethics, physiology, biomechanics, psychology, and sports medicine. Emphasis on providing a healthy, enjoyable sports experience at an appropriate level of training.

338 Adapted Physical Education (3)
Teaches the modification of physical activities for people with disabilities preventing their unrestricted participation in vigorous activities. Includes study of the social and psychological problems of mainstreaming.

339 Movement Experiences for Children (3)
Studies the overall development of children in grades K-6. Emphasizes planning movement experiences based on individual needs. Offered even years, (2006, 2008), Fall. Corequisite/prerequisite: Education 221.

355 Clinical Decision Making (3)
Studies and enhances the clinical decision making process for an athletic trainer as it relates to injuries to the upper and lower extremities and spine, including the abdomen and thorax. It will also provide criteria for return to play from an injury/illness. Students should have a working knowledge of anatomy. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

391 Applied Clinical Experiences (1)
A minimum of 40 hours of laboratory sessions and supervised field experiences, supplemented with additional instruction within the various fields of Exercise Science and Athletic Training, for 1 semester hour of credit. Practical experience within each discipline will focus on translation of theory into practice, development of practical skills in "real-life" settings, and clinical skills in appropriate settings.  Supplemental instruction will focus on refining individual knowledge as well as practical and clinical skills. May be repeated for credit. Requires permission of adviser and department chair.

412 Medical Conditions and Topics in Athletics (3)
Provides an overview of non-orthopedic medical conditions that may affect athletic participation, including: skin disorders, eating disorders, anemia, diabetes, asthma, closed head injury, systemic conditions, blood-borne pathogens, and emotional stress. Also discusses administrative concerns in athletic training. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

420 Sport Marketing (3)
Studies the theory and application of marketing to the sport and sport business settings. The emphasis is upon real-world application and examines both service- and product-related educational and business applications.

421 Sport Psychology (3) (Psychology 421)
The psychological foundations that underlie sport and physical performance, with the emphasis on application rather than theory. Includes motor skill learning, motivation, social interaction, mental training, and the effects of stress, injury and burnout. Examines goal setting, characteristics of peak performance, relaxation, imagery training, and implementing psychological training programs. Prerequisite: PSYC 222.

425 Exercise Physiology (3)
A study of the physiological responses and adaptations to exercise as related to human performance limitations, training effect and health related benefits. Emphasis is given to the cardiovascular basis of such phenomena, interrelating topics such as circulatory physiology, energy production, and cardiorespiratory function.

426 Biomechanics (3)
Studies the mechanics of motion applied to human movement and fitness and sport skills. Math 111 is recommended before taking this course. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

427 Modalities of Therapy (3)
Examines the treatment of orthopedic injuries using thermotherapy, hydrotherapy, electrotherapy, and acoustic therapy. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

431 Program Management (3)
Studies the principles of managing physical education, intramural, and athletic programs, and sport and fitness businesses. Topics include facility management, human relations, staff motivation, legal liability, scheduling, staffing, and related duties of facility managers, physical educators, athletic directors, and coaches.

432 Research Methods in Exercise Science (3)
Introduces design and application of research projects measuring cognitive, affective and psychomotor performance. Includes use of statistical procedures and interpretation of published research in the discipline. Prerequisites: MATH 160.

433 Administration of Athletic Training Programs (3)
Studies the standards, policies, procedures and problems of managing athletic training programs for high schools, colleges, and professional organizations.

441 Secondary Physical Education and Health Methods (3)
Covers the needs of students (Grades 7-12) in physical education and health. Students learn and analyze appropriate activities, plan instructional units, and develop yearly programs. Offered odd years (2005, 2007), Fall. Corequisite/prerequisite: Education 221.

450 Design of Strength and Conditioning Programs (3)
Applies the study of bioenergetic, neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory physiology to the principles of designing strength and conditioning programs. Elite performance in various sports is examined for energy system, biomechanical and kinesiological factors. Offered in odd years (2005, 2007), Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL 221; EXER 326, 425.

452 Exercise Testing and Prescription (3)
This course examines the techniques used to test and evaluate all components of fitness; including cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness, body composition, and muscular flexibility. In addition, stress management techniques are introduced. Guidelines to prescribe exercise based on fitness evaluations and practical use of relevant equipment are discussed. Offered in even years, Spring (2006, 2008). Prerequisites: BIOL 221, EXER 425; current CPR certification.

461 Sport Entrepreneurship (3)
Studies the start-up process of the private sport-related business. Students work in teams with assigned and original ideas to analyze the potential for the enterprise, develop the business and marketing plans, and plan the process of acquiring financing. The emphasis is upon real-world application and examines both service- and product-related businesses. Prerequisite: Senior year.

462 Advanced Sport Management (3)
A study of theory and its application in sport management, including topics such as basic management, personnel, ethics, communications, sport economics, accounting and budgeting, sport marketing, sports law, computer applications, research, and the future of sport management.

490 Directed Study (3)
On-campus study or research experience appropriate to the major course of study. Arranged through the Department Chair. Requires permission of adviser and Chair.

492 Practicum (3)
Beginning on- or off-campus work experience appropriate to the major course of study. Requires permission of adviser and Chair.

494 Internship (6)
Supervised field experience in off-campus setting appropriate to the major course of study. Work is performed under a contract signed by the student, the Chair, and a representative of the sponsoring organization. May be taken at any time in the calendar year, if arranged by the start of the appropriate academic term. Requires permission of adviser and Chair.

496 Research Project (3)
Provides advanced students with the opportunity to conduct a worthy research project under the direction of an experienced researcher in the field. Prepares students for graduate and professional level research. The proposed study must be approved by the studentís adviser and the Department Chair.

 

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