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Chemistry/Physics Department

Chemistry, Physics and the General College Curriculum | Chemistry
Biochemistry | Chemistry Course Listing | Physics Course Listing
Forensic Science Course Listing

Professor: Dr. Jung

Associate Professor: Dr. Bryan (Chair), Dr. Wells

Assistant Professor: Dr. Coker

Instructor: Mr. Ezell, Mr. Fedorchak

Chemistry, Physics, and the General College Curriculum
Students may use chemistry or physics courses to fulfill four to eight semester hours of the general college science requirement. (See General College Curriculum requirements for details.)

Requirements for a Major in Chemistry (CIP 40.0501)
A candidate for a Bachelorís degree with a major in chemistry must, in addition to the General College Curriculum, complete with a "C" average or better at least 34 hours of chemistry courses, including: CHEM 111, 113, 215, 227, 228, 331, 334, 451, and 452 (plus a minimum of 4 hours CHEM electives 300 level or higher). Statistics (MATH 160), one year of calculus (MATH 122, 223), and one year of calculus-based physics (PHYS 251, 252) are required of all chemistry majors. Candidates who are considering graduate studies are recommended to take an additional year of math (MATH 224, 337) and CHEM 430 as an elective. Chemistry majors are also encouraged to select a minor complementary to the field in which they wish to work (e.g. biology, math/computer science, business or mass communication.)

Courses numbered above 300 may be offered only in alternate years. CHEM 430 (Biochemistry) is cross-listed with BIOL 430 and is taught in the biology department.

Requirements for a minor in Chemistry
Students wishing a minor in Chemistry must complete with a "C" average or better at least 22 hours of chemistry courses including: CHEM 111, 113, 215, 227, and 228. The remaining hours may be obtained using any CHEM course numbered 300 or above (including seminars and research).

Requirements for a major in Biochemistry (CIP 26.0202)
A candidate for a Bachelorís degree with a major in biochemistry must, in addition to the General College Curriculum, complete with a "C" average or better in biology and chemistry courses. Statistics (MATH 160), two semesters of calculus (MATH 122, 223), and one year of calculus-based physics (PHYS 251, 252) are also required of biochemistry major. Candidates who are considering graduate studies are recommended to take an additional year of calculus and an additional 300 or 400 level BIOL or CHEM course as an elective.

Biology requirements include BIOL 111, 201, 301, 334, 342, 430, and 508 plus one 200 level elective for a total of 32 semester hours.*

Chemistry requirements include CHEM 111, 113, 215, 227, 228, and 334 for a total of twenty-four semester hours.*

* Note: Students are required to take either BIOL or CHEM 451 or 452 Seminar for an additional one- semester hour.

Chemistry Course Listing (CHEM 000)

100 Preparatory Chemistry (3)
A course designed for students who are weak in science and math, but must eventually take CHEM 111. Highly recommend for students with little or no chemistry background. Note: Since this course has no laboratory, it does not fulfill the core curriculum science requirement. (Spring, Summer).

101 Elementary Chemistry I (4)
This course is designed to acquaint non-science majors with the fundamental subject matter of chemistry with intellectual integrity while minimizing esoteric theories and rigorous mathematics. Selected chemical concepts and principles will be developed. CHEM 101 will satisfy general degree requirements for the non-science majors; but cannot be used as elective hours by science majors who are required to take CHEM 111 and/or CHEM 113.

111 General Chemistry I (4)
This course is an introduction to fundamental chemical concepts including states of matter, physical and chemical properties, stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, and chemical composition. An emphasis will be placed on atomic structure and its effects on the chemical and physical properties. (Fall and Summer).

Prerequisites*: Students must meet one of the requirements below to register for CHEM 111: 1) a math SAT score of greater than 450; 2) a score of greater than 50% on the TOLEDO Exam (administered by Chemistry Department.); or 3) a grade of "C" or better in MATH 111, MATH 112, and CHEM 100.

*Note: Advisors will be encouraged to enroll entering students according to their math SAT score. Student will be given the opportunity to take the TOLEDO Exam, the night before the first day of classes each Fall Semester. Students not meeting the TOLEDO Exam requirement should be registered in MATH 111 in the Fall and should then take MATH 112 and CHEM 100 during the following Spring.

113 General Chemistry II (4)
A continuation of CHEM 111. Emphasis will be placed on chemical and physical properties of solutions, chemical equilibria, acid/base equilibria, chemical kinetics, descriptive chemistry. Less emphasis will be placed on general thermodynamics and electrochemistry. (Spring and Summer) Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CHEM 111.

215 Quantitative Analysis (4)
A course in the fundamental principles and techniques of chemical analysis. Topics include volumetric, spectrochemical, and chromatographic methods, as well as statistical interpretation of data. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better on CHEM 113. (Fall). 

227, 228 Organic Chemistry I, II (4,4)
A mechanistic approach to the chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. Topics include spectroscopy, stereochemistry, lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. Prerequisite for 227: A grade of C or better in CHEM 113. Prerequisite for 228: A grade of C or better in CHEM 227.

(Please Note: There is some evidence that women in their first trimester of pregnancy should avoid inhalation of some organic vapors.)

307 Bio-organic Chemistry (2)
A continuation of CHEM 228 focusing on the chemistry of important biological molecules including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. There is no lab associated with this course. Prerequisite: CHEM 228.

331 Inorganic Chemistry (4)
A course that is a blend of theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Topics to be considered include: bonding, acid-base properties of inorganic compounds, and transition metal chemistry. Laboratory preparations will be included. Prerequisite: CHEM 228. (Spring - alternate years). 

334 Physical Chemistry (4)
An introduction to classical thermodynamics, kinetics, and equilibrium. Specific topics include studies of the states of matter, thermochemistry, entropy, and free energy. Some aspects of electrochemical phenomena and biochemical processes may also be included. Prerequisites: CHEM 228 and MATH 122.

429 Organic Preparations (2)
A laboratory course employing special techniques in the preparation of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 228.

430 Biochemistry (4) (BIOL 430)
An investigation of the properties and structures of organic molecules, with an emphasis on proteins and nucleic acid and how they relate to cellular structure and function. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. (Fall). Prerequisites: BIOL 111, BIOL 201, and CHEM 227.

431 Inorganic Preparations (2)
A laboratory course employing special techniques in the preparation of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 331.

441, 442 Special Topics in Chemistry (2-4)
An advanced topic of special interest designed to supplement material covered in lower level courses by including current literature. Topics vary by semester. (Fall, Spring) Prerequisites: CHEM 215, CHEM 228.

445, 446 Chemical Research (2-4)
An upper-division student in good standing is urged to pursue an experimental research project with the guidance of any member of the chemistry faculty chosen by the student. It is recommended that such projects be initiated in the fall semester. 

451, 452 Literature Seminar (1,1)
Senior chemistry majors are required to participate for two semesters; others are encouraged to attend. (Fall and Spring). 

Physics Course Listing (PHYS 000)

221, 222 General Physics I and II (4,4)
An algebra/trigonometry-based study of classical mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, optics and nuclear phenomena. Laboratory work is coordinated with lectures. Intended for those interested in the quantitative investigation of the natural world. Prerequisite: MATH 112.

231 Introduction to Astronomy (4)
This covers the structure of the Universe we live in as well as the history of this oldest of sciences. Included is a study of the Earth/Moon system, the Solar System, the Milky Way, and Deep Space Objects. Because of the nighttime lab, this course is only offered in the Spring semester. Prerequisite: MATH 112 or permission of the instructor.

251, 252 Fundamentals of Physics I and II (4,4)
A calculus-based study of classical mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, optics and nuclear phenomena. Differential and integral calculus is used in conceptual development and problem-solving. Laboratory work is coordinated with lectures. Intended for biochemistry, chemistry, math, and pre-engineering majors . Prerequisite: MATH 122.

341, 342 Special Topics in Physics (2-4)
An advanced topic of special interest designed to supplement material covered in lower level courses by including current literature. May include a lab component.  Topics vary by semester. (Fall, Spring) Prerequisites: PHYS 221/222 or PHYS 251/252.

Forensic Science Course Listing (FNSC 000)

Forensic science courses with laboratory may be taken to meet the general college curriculum science requirement.  Forensic science courses cannot be taken as biology or chemistry electives.

101 Introduction to Forensic Science (4)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of forensics science.  The use of science and technology to solve crime will be the major thrust of the course.  Major topics emphasized include: crime scene analysis, evidence collection and analysis, and legal issues surrounding forensic science. The laboratory work will explore the science behind evidence analysis. The course is team-taught by members of the Criminal Justice, Biology, and Chemistry/Physics Departments.  The course qualifies as a General College Curriculum.

 

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