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Biological Sciences

Biology and the General College Curriculum | Biochemistry
Biological Sciences Course Listing | Environmental Science
Environmental Science Course Listing | Science Education Course Listing

Professor: Dr. Hammond (Dean of the College)

Associate Professors: Dr. Larsen, Dr. Metz (Chair), Dr. Weaver

Assistant Professors: Dr. Bartlett, Dr. Guzman, Dr. Thomas, Mrs. Williams, Dr. You

Adjunct Faculty: Dr. Cook

Biology and the General College Curriculum
Students may use biology or environmental science courses to fulfill four to eight semester hours of the general college science requirement.  (See General College Curriculum requirements for details.)  Science courses without laboratories do not meet the science requirement of the General College Curriculum.

Requirements for a Major in Biology (CIP 26.0101)
A major in biology (B.S. degree) may be obtained within a general curriculum or one which follows specific guidelines for physicians assisting, physical therapy, teacher licensure, or pre-professional (preparation for graduate or professional schools) studies.  The student majoring in biology must complete a minimum of 39 hours in biology, and these must include credit for BIOL 111, 201, 202, 203, 205, 327, 342, 430 or 437, and 451.  Students are encouraged to complete more than the minimum number of hours in biology.

Ancillary requirements include MATH 112 (or 122) and 160; CHEM 111, 113, and 227; and PHYS 221 and 222 or PHYS 251 and 252.

Requirements for a Minor in Biology
Students wishing to minor in biology may do so by completing BIOL 111 and an additional sixteen semester hours in biology courses numbered at the 200-level or above.  The sixteen hours must include a minimum of three courses with laboratory.

Requirements for Major in Biology with Teacher Licensure (CIP 13.1322)
Students seeking secondary teacher certification in biology must complete a minimum of 35 hours in biology, including credit for the biology courses listed for a major in biology.  They must also complete PSYC 222; EDUC 221, 341, 385, 431, 432, 441, 453, 454, and 458; and SIED 453.

Requirements for a Major in Biology with a Pre-Professional Concentration (CIP 26.0101/51.1102)
A major in Biology may be obtained which follows specific guidelines for entering post-baccalaureate studies in the medical professions, or biological research of various kinds.  In addition to the requirements for a major in biology, the student following this track in biology must also complete CHEM 228 and MATH 122.  Pre-professional students should tailor their biology electives and open electives to meet the requirements of their specific professional area of focus, in consultation with their academic adviser.  The Pre-Professional Concentration requires students to earn a grade of "C" or higher in all science courses (biology, chemistry, and physics.)

Requirements for a Major in Biology with a Pre-Physical Therapy Concentration (CIP 26.0101/51.1199)
A major in Biology may be obtained which follows specific guidelines for entering post-baccalaureate studies in physical therapy.  In addition to the requirements for a major in biology, the student following this track in biology must also complete BIOL 221, 301, 310, 320, 334; CHEM 228; PSYC 222, 369, 461; and EXER 425, 426.  One computer course is also recommended.  Students should maintain documentation of work experience in physical therapy settings.  Students following this concentration should check with physical therapy graduate programs to verify specific requirements of the programs.

Requirements for a Major in Biology with a Pre-Physicians Assistant Concentration (CIP 26.0101)
A major in Biology may be obtained which follows specific guidelines for entering studies in physician assistant programs.  In addition to the requirements for a Major in Biology, the student following this track in biology must also complete BIOL 221, 310, 320, 334, 430; and CHEM 228.  PA programs vary in their requirements for work experience in the medical field.  Most applicants range from 2-5 years of experience, including volunteer work, nursing experience, laboratory work and military experience.

Requirements for a Major in Biochemistry  (CIP 26.0202)
A candidate for the Bachelorís degree with a major in biochemistry must satisfactorily complete the following courses in biology and chemistry:

Biology requirements include BIOL 111, 201, 301, 334, 342, 430 and 508 plus one 200 level or higher elective for a total of 32 semester hours.*

Chemistry requirements include CHEM 111, 113, 215, 227, 228, and 334 for a total of twenty-four semester hours.* 

* Note: Students are required to take either BIOL or CHEM 451.

Two semesters of calculus (MATH 122, 223) and one year of physics (PHYS 251, 252) are required of a biochemistry major.  Candidates who are considering graduate studies are recommended to take an additional year of calculus and an additional 300 or 400 level BIOL or CHEM course as electives.

Biological Sciences Course Listing (BIOL 000)

111 Basic Biology (4)
An introduction to biological chemistry, cell biology, energy relationships, reproduction, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall, Spring, and occasional Summers.  Prerequisite to all biology courses except BIOL 215 or BIOL 226.

201 Cellular & Molecular Biology (4)
A study of the cell, with a focus on eukaryotic cells.  Emphasis will be placed on the fundamental principles such as the unity and diversity of cell biology, the relationship between structure and function, cell regulation, the flow of genetic information, and cell specialization.  Methods in cell biology will be interwoven throughout the course.  Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.  Spring semester.  Prerequisite: BIOL 111 (grade of C or better strongly recommended).

202 Botany (4)
A first level study of plant biology, concentrating upon the form and function of flowering plants, with emphasis placed on the roles of plants in the environment, the relationships between plants and other organisms, and the history of use and manipulation of plants for human benefit. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week.  Spring semester.  Prerequisite: BIOL 111 required; CHEM 111 recommended.

203 Zoology (4)
The biology of the major groups of animals, with emphasis on general structural plans and diversity, ecology, reproduction, and evolution. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall semester. Prerequisite: BIOL 111.

205 Introduction to Biological Research (3)
Designed to give the beginning biology major an introduction to literature resources, topic selection, use of statistics, scientific logic, and the oral and written presentation of results. Three lecture and two laboratory hours each week.  Cannot be taken to fulfill the general college curriculum science requirement.  Fall semester.  Prerequisite: BIOL 111.

215 Plants for Pleasure and Profit (4)
A general course in horticultural practices designed for the practical utilization of plants of all kinds for personal benefit and pleasure. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Laboratory requires hands‑on activities in the greenhouse and field. Occasional Fall semesters and Summers.

220 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
The first semester of a two semester sequence of Human Anatomy and Physiology. This course presents the chemical and cellular basis of human anatomy and physiology. This course covers organ systems to include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Laboratory work/participation is essential to the understanding of the material presented in this course. This course is intended for those students who are interested in careers in medicine, nursing, and biomedical sciences. Prerequisite: BIOL 111. Students receiving credit for BIOL 220 may not receive credit for BIOL 221.

221 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
A detailed study of the structure and function of the major organ systems in man.   Continuity is maintained by emphasizing regulation and integration of these systems. This one semester course meets three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall, Spring, and occasional Summers.  Prerequisite: BIOL 111. Students receiving credit for BIOL 221 may not receive credit for BIOL 220 or BIOL 223.

223 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
The second semester of a two semester sequence of Human Anatomy and Physiology. This course covers organ systems to include endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory work/participation is essential to the understanding of the material presented in this course. This course is intended for those students who are interested in careers in medicine, nursing, and biomedical sciences. Prerequisite: BIOL 111and BIOL 220. Students receiving credit for BIOL 223 may not receive credit for BIOL 221.

224 Vertebrate Natural History (4)  (ENVS 224)
Identification, classification, and life histories of common vertebrate animals of North and Central America. Study of these animals in their natural habitats is emphasized. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week.  Occasional Fall semesters.  Prerequisite: BIOL 111.

226 Ornithology (4)  (ENVS 226)
Identification, classification, evolution, behavior, and life histories of birds. Study of birds in their natural habitats is emphasized. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week.  Spring semester and occasional summers.

241 Field Botany (4)  (ENVS 241)
The collection, identification, and biology of vascular plants, with particular attention to their role in the natural economy. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Occasional Fall semesters and Summers.  Prerequisite: BIOL 111.

301 Cytology/Histology (4)
Emphasis will be given to special topics in cell biology, such as the cytoskeleton and motility, cell growth and division, and cancer.  These topics may vary from year to year, depending on the current literature.  Laboratory exercises consist mainly of tissue culture and histology.  This course is primarily designed for biology and biochemistry majors, and pre-professional, pre-pharmacy, pre-medical and pre-veterinary students.  Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.  Spring semester.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 111, BIOL 201 and CHEM 227.

310 Advanced Human Physiology (3)
A detailed system by system study of advanced physiological concepts, including diseases and the bodyís compensatory mechanisms to restore health.  Three lecture hours each week. Fall semester of even‑numbered years.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 111, 221; CHEM 111 is recommended but not required. 

315 Bioinformatics (3)
An introduction to the use of bioinformatics tools to answer biological questions.  Students will use a variety of computer analysis tools to retrieve information from nucleic acid or protein sequence databases; perform sequence comparisons; view and manipulate protein structure, and gain experience applying such tools to questions that might be asked in medicine, forensics or other areas of biology.  Three lecture hours each week.  Fall semester, even numbered years.  Prerequisites: BIOL 111, BIOL 201.

319 Biomedical Ethics (2)
Interdisciplinary approach to special topics associated with biomedical ethics, with special emphasis on social and legal issues. This two-hour course will include analysis and discussion of case studies.   Each student is expected to participate in class discussion.  Fall semesters of even-numbered years.  Prerequisites: Biology 111 plus a minimum of four credit hours in biology numbered 200 or above.  Biology 221 is highly recommended.  Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

320 Developmental Anatomy (4)
An integrated approach to the study of comparative vertebrate anatomy and embryology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall semester of odd‑numbered years. Prerequisites: BIOL 111; BIOL 203 and 221 are recommended but not required.

321 Environmental Toxicology (3)  (ENVS 321)
An introductory overview of environmental toxicology with emphasis on the effects of chemicals and toxic compounds on organisms (including humans), populations, communities, and ecosystems.  Due to its interdisciplinary nature, the material will be approached from three distinct functional levels:  molecular and cellular; physiological; and ecological.  Three lecture hours per week.  Occasional Spring semesters.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 111 or ENVS 111.  BIOL 201, 202, 203; CHEM 111, 113 are recommended but not required.

322 Limnology (3)  (ENVS 322)
An introductory study of freshwater ecosystems including an overview of the structure and function of inland waters (primarily lakes, streams and rivers).  Physical, chemical and biological components of aquatic ecosystems will be investigated.  Ecological interactions will be studied at the organism, population, biotic community and aquatic ecosystem levels.  Three lecture hours per week.  Spring semester (Alternate years with BIOL 321).  Prerequisites:  BIOL 111 or ENVS 111.  BIOL 201, 202, 203; CHEM 111, 113 are recommended but not required.

327 Ecology (4)  (ENVS 327)
A study of the interactions which determine the distribution and abundance of organisms. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall semester. Prerequisites: BIOL 111, 202, 203, and 205.

333 General Parasitology (4) 
A survey of the study of parasitism and tropical medicine with particular emphasis but not limited to parasites of human and veterinary significance.  The course will involve aspects of biology, ecology, morphology, taxonomy, epidemiology and pathogenesis of the major classes of parasites.  Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week.  Occasional Spring Semesters.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 111, BIOL 201, BIOL 203, and  CHEM 227 (can be taken concurrently.)

334 Microbiology and Immunology (4)
An elementary treatment of microorganisms, primarily bacteria. Special emphasis is given to study techniques and the roles of these organisms in ecology, health, and disease. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall semester. Prerequisite: BIOL 111, 201, CHEM 113 required; CHEM 227, 228 recommended.

335 Immunology (3)
An introduction to the principles of immunology.  Topics discussed will include the cell types of the immune system, antibody production and humoral immunity, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines, vaccines, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiency diseases.  Three lecture hours each week.  Spring semester of even-numbered years.  Prerequisites: BIOL 111, 201 and 342 (or concurrent); BIOL 334 is recommended but not required. 

336 Medical Microbiology (3)
This course integrates microbiology, immunology, and molecular biology to explain mechanisms by which microbes cause disease.  The methods by which bacteria attach to and then invade the human body to establish infection and subsequent interaction with the immune system will be investigated.  Special emphasis will be placed on HIV infections and emerging infectious diseases as well as vaccine development.  Spring semester of odd-numbered years.  Prerequisite: BIOL 334.

342 Genetics (4)
Lectures will include the principles of Mendelian heredity, linkage, mutation, population genetics, and molecular genetics, with emphasis on the mechanisms regulating the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.  Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Spring semester. Prerequisites: BIOL 111, 201, CHEM 113; CHEM 227 recommended.

351 Creation, Evolution, or Both? (3)
An investigation into the origins of life, using an integrated scientific and Christian perspective.  Coverage includes the scientific method, the philosophy of science, the relationship of science and religion, the history of evolutionary theory, the science behind evolutionary theory, the history of creationism, young-earth creationism, intelligent design, and major creationist objections to evolutionary theory, focusing on the geological record and earth history.  Three lecture hours per week.  Occasional Fall semesters.  Prerequisites: BIOL 111, ENGL 101, 102, and two 200-level literature courses; RELG 125.

430 Biochemistry (4)
An investigation of the properties and structures of organic molecules, with an emphasis on proteins and nucleic acids and how they relate to cellular structure and function.  Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week.  Fall semester.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 111, 201 and CHEM 227.

437 Animal Physiology (4)
The comparative study of physiological processes in different animals through an organ-system approach. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Spring semester. Prerequisites: BIOL 111, 203 and CHEM 113.

447‑448 Biology Thesis (2, 2)
The investigation of a problem for two semesters of the senior year, the results of which are reported in thesis form. Credit for 447 is deferred until completion of 448.  Open to science majors and minors only.

451 Seminar (1)
Individual reports and group discussions of the results of published biological research, student field or laboratory research on selected topics in biology. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours. Fall, spring semesters. Prerequisite: BIOL 205, junior or senior standing.  Open to science majors and minors only.

460 Special Topics (1-4)
Investigation of an important aspect of modern biology under the supervision of an instructor.  Consists of a combination of lectures, discussions, and laboratory experiences.
 

465 Biology Internship (1-6)
Students may obtain academic credit for participating in a practical learning experience outside Campbell University.  This experience must address a biology-related problem, must involve college-level work, and must have a component of active, hands-on activity. It is the studentís responsibility to identify and arrange for the internship activity.  They must then make an application to the Biology Department and receive approval of their internship before performing the activity.  Prerequisites:  Student must have performed a total of 64 credit hours, with a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 in their major (Biology or Biochemistry), and 2.5 overall. 

Courses numbered at the 500 level are open to both graduate education students and advanced undergraduates.

508 Molecular Techniques (4)
A laboratory‑based course that introduces students to modern molecular techniques.  In addition to learning basic research laboratory skills, students will learn to isolate and purify DNA, analyze, manipulate  DNA by restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis and ligation, label DNA by various methods, perform non‑radioactive detection of Southern blot analyses, and perform polymerase chain reactions. Bacterial transformation and other microbial techniques will be used through out. Molecular Forensic techniques are also explored and tested. Lectures and laboratories are held in joint sessions.  Summer session.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 342 and CHEM 227 (or concurrent enrollment).

Environmental Science

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Science  (CIP 26.0101)
Students wishing to minor in environmental science may do so by completing ENVS 111, ENVS 112, and an additional twelve semester hours in cognate courses chosen in consultation with the environmental science adviser.

Environmental Science Course Listing (ENVS 000)

The Department of Biological Sciences offers the following ENVS courses.

111 Introduction to Environmental Science I (4)
Provide an overview of current environmental problems and issues with an emphasis on biology, chemistry, and earth science. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week.  Fall semester.  No prerequisites.

112 Introduction to Environmental Science II (4)
Provide an overview of current environmental problems and issues with an emphasis on social aspects.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week.  Spring semester.  ENVS 111 is recommended but not required.

224 Vertebrate Natural History (4) (BIOL 224)
Identification, classification, and life histories of common vertebrate animals of North and Central America.  Study of these animals in their natural habitats is emphasized. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Occasional Fall semesters.

226 Ornithology (4) (BIOL 226)
Identification, classification, evolution, behavior, and life histories of birds. Study of birds in their natural habitats is emphasized. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Spring semester and occasional summers.

241 Field Botany (4) (BIOL 241)
The collection, identification, and biology of vascular plants, with particular attention to their role in the natural economy. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Occasional Fall semesters and summers.

321 Environmental Toxicology (3)  (BIOL 321)
An introductory overview of environmental toxicology with emphasis on the effects of chemicals and toxic compounds on organisms (including humans), populations, communities, and ecosystems.  Due to its interdisciplinary nature, the materiel will be approached from three distinct functional levels:  molecular and cellular; physiological; and ecological.  Three lecture hours per week.  Occasional Spring semesters.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 111 or ENVS 111.  BIOL 201, 202, 203; CHEM 111, 113 are recommended but not required.

322 Limnology (3)  (BIOL 322)
An introductory study of freshwater ecosystems including an overview of the structure and function of inland waters (primarily lakes, streams and rivers).  Physical, chemical and biological components of aquatic ecosystems will be investigated.  Ecological interactions will be studied at the organism, population, biotic community and aquatic ecosystem levels.  Three lecture hours per week.  Occasional Spring semesters.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 111 or ENVS 111.  BIOL 201, 202, 203; CHEM 111, 113 are recommended but not required.

327 Ecology (4) (BIOL 327)
A study of the interactions which determine the distribution and abundance of organisms. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week.  Spring semester. Prerequisites: BIOL 111, 202, 203, and 205.

Forensic Science Course Listing (FNSC 000)

Forensic science courses with laboratory may be taken to meet the general college curriculum science requirement.  Forensic science courses cannot be taken as biology or chemistry electives.

101 Introduction to Forensic Science (4)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of forensics science.  The use of science and technology to solve crime will be the major thrust of the course.  Major topics emphasized include: crime scene analysis, evidence collection and analysis, and legal issues surrounding forensic science. The laboratory work will explore the science behind evidence analysis. The course is team-taught by members of the Criminal Justice, Biology, and Chemistry/Physics Departments.  The course qualifies as a General College Curriculum science course.  Prerequisite:  none.

Science Education Course Listing (SIED 000)

The following SIED course is offered through the Department of Biological Sciences and in cooperation with the School of Education.

453 Materials and Methods in Secondary Science (3)
Study of the specific methods, techniques, practices, and the selection and organization of instructional materials and teaching methods appropriate to high school science subjects.  Open only to seniors and designed to be taken prior to the student teaching semester. Taught in conjunction with the course in general methods, both of which are required for certification. Three hours of lecture each week.  Fall or Spring semester, offered as required by students in the Teacher Licensure Program.

 

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