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Transfer Credit/Course Descriptions


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North Carolina Community College Course Equivalencies

The following link will provide a list of North Carolina Community College courses that have previously transfer into Campbell University for equivalent credit and course content. If the courses you have completed do not appear on this list, it does not necessarily mean that they will not transfer for credit

Equivalencies for the North Carolina Community College Courses

 

Campbell Degree Requirements

These curriculum outlines will provide you with the current degree requirements for completion of our undergraduate degree programs offered at Campbell University's Main Campus. Use them, along with the Undergraduate Course Catalog or the Equivalencies for the North Carolina Community College General Curriculum, to help select your current institution's most most pertinent courses for transfer. Please email [email protected] with any questions.

 

Campbell University Course Descriptions

Below you will find course descriptions for the majority of our GCC options. To view all course descriptions for Campbell University courses see our Undergraduate Course Catalog. (Note: You will need to scroll through the catalog page by page. Course descriptions begin on page 118.)

 

North Carolina Comprehensive Articulation Agreement

Campbell University has partnered with the North Carolina Department of Community Colleges in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA). This agreement addresses the transfer of credits in the core curriculum between institutions in the North Carolina Community College system for students who wish to transfer to Campbell University. North Carolina Community College students who have completed the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree programs will be considered to have fulfilled the institution-wide, lower division of the Campbell University General College Curriculum. Note: The Campbell University General College Curriculum requirements of Religion 125, Foreign Language and Lifetime Wellness will not be granted credit through the CAA, unless the equivalent courses were completed as part of the student’s community college curriculum. Additionally, students may be required to complete additional subject matter if they did not meet the major specific GCC requirements upon transfer.

 

Campbell University General College Curriculum (GCC)

All degrees offered at Campbell University require completion of the General College Curriculum. Completion of these courses is not required in order to transfer to Campbell. However, any of the Campbell GCC requirements not completed prior to transfer must be completed in order to earn a degree form Campbell Univerity.The GCC consists of the subrequirements A - L listed below. Though all majors require the GCC, each major may vary when it comes to specific subject areas. The subject areas that will vary by major are Mathematics, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences and Foreign Language. Be sure to view the major guides and the notes herein, to find the requirements for your intended major. Course descriptions for most GCC options are listed at the bottom of this page.

 

General College Curriculum

A. RELG 125 (3 hours)
B. ENGL 100, 101, 102, 2xx (6 - 12 hours, depending on placement)
C. ART 131, MUSC 131, or THEA 131 (3 hours)
D. HIST 111 or 112 (3 hours)
E. Foreign Language* (FREN, SPAN, GERM, GREE, LATN, or PORT)– number of hours varies by degree: B.A. - 101, 102, 201, 202 (3 - 12 hours, depending on placement); B.S. - 101, 102, 201 (3 - 9 hours, depending on placement); B.S.W. - 101, 102, 201 (3 - 9 hours, depending on placement); B.B.A. - Complete two foreign language courses. This requirement may be met by presentation of two or more high school units (years) in the same language (0 – 6 hours); B.S.N. - Foreign language is not required.* Note: Students may substitute a specified Foreign Language by attaining a satisfactory score on an examination approved in advance by the Chair of the Foreign Language Department.

F. Humanities/Fine Arts Electives: RELG 202 or higher; PHIL 121; ENGL LIT 201 or higher; HIST; Foreign Language 221 or higher.

G. Social/Behavioral Sciences Electives: CRIM, ECON, GEOG, POLS, PSYC, SOCI, or COMM 240.

F./G. Humanities/Social/Behavioral Sciences Electives (9 hours) - Students must take a total of 9 additional credit hours from the Humanities/Fine Arts and Social/Behavioral Sciences elective lists. At least 1 course must be selected from the Humanities/Fine Arts elective list and at least 1 course must be selected from the Social/Behavioral Sciences elective list.

H. Laboratory Science: (BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, PHYS, GEOL, or FNSC) requirements and number of hours varies by degree: B.A. - one course (4 hours); B.S. - two courses (8 hours); B.S.W. - one course (4 hours); B.B.A. - one course (4 hours); B.S.N. - two courses (8 hours)

I. Mathematics: MATH 122; or two courses from: MATH 111 or higher as selected by the major department (4 - 6 hours)

J. PE 185 (2 hours) Lifetime Wellness

K. CUC (.5 - 2 hours) number of hours varies by entering academic classification:

Students entering with less than 24 semester hours completed will attend CUC for four semesters (2 hours)

Students entering with 24 semester hours completed will attend CUC 200 for three semesters (1.5 hours)

Students entering with 60 hours semester hours completed will attend CUC 200 for two semesters (1 hour)

Students entering with 98 semester hours completed will attend CUC 200 for one semester (.5 hours)

L. First Year Experience (1 hour) All first-year students must complete the First-Year Experience class that correlates to his/her major during the first term of study. Seminars include: BADM 100: students in the Lundy-Fetterman School of Business. CUFS 100: students in the College of Arts and Sciences or the School of Education. NURS 100: pre-nursing students; recommended for transferring-in pre-nursing students. PHAR 100: pre-pharmacy students. Transfer students are exempt from the freshman seminar requirement.

 

 

General College Curriculum - Course Descriptions

RELG 125 Intro to Christianity A study of the biblical foundations, historical development, and traditional beliefs and practices of Christianity and its impact on Western culture and on the lives of those who embrace it. RELG 125 is prerequisite to all other Religion courses (except for Religion majors, who normally begin with 202 and 212).
 

ENGL 101 Academic Writing This course prepares students for academic writing. Students will practice writing papers requiring summary, synthesis, argument, research and documentation in MLA style. The course is designed to improve the clarity, concision, structure, and logic of student writing and to serve as a prerequisite to English 102. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or exemption.
 

ENGL 102 Academic Writing and Literature This course develops students’ critical reading, writing, and research skills by examining a variety of literary works and genres. Serves as a prerequisite to all English 200 level courses. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
 

ENGL 203 American Literature I Topics in American literature from the colonial period to 1865. Prerequisite: ENGL 101/102.
 

ENGL 204 American Literature II Topics in American literature from 1865 to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 101/102.

ENGL 2O1 British Literature I Topics in British literature from Beowulf through the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 101/102.
 

ENGL 2O2 British Literature II Topics in British literature from the Romantic period through the twentieth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 101/102.
 

ENGL 2O5 World Literature I Topics in world literature to the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 101/102.
 

ENGL 2O6 World Literature II Topics in world literature after the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 101/102.
 

ART 131 Introduction to Art An introduction to the study of visual art, approaching art through learning experiences such as art history, art criticism, the styles, the structures, and the interaction of meaning and mediums. This course is appropriate for non-art majors and art majors. Three lecture hours per week.
 

MUSC 131 Music Appreciation An introduction to music through a rudimentary understanding of the principles of form and the elements of music. Various styles and types of vocal and instrumental works are studied. Historical and cultural backgrounds are included to show their influence on musical development from Gregorian Chant to the present.
 

THEA 131 Introduction to Theatre A broad survey of theater from its origins to modern times. Work on current productions, typically some afternoons in the Scene Shop, is required.
 

HIST 111 Western Civilizations I This course examines the major political, social, cultural, economic and intellectual developments which gave rise to Western civilization and its continuance.
 

HIST 112 Western Civilizations II This course examines the major political, social, cultural, economic and intellectual developments which gave rise to Western civilization and its continuance.
 

FLAN 101 Elementary (Foreign Language) I Introduction to the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, aural comprehension, and culture in a contextualized format. Grammatical concepts include the usage of present tense of regular, irregular and stem-changing verbs, present progressive tense, articles, concepts of noun/adjective agreement, prepositions, preterit and imperfect tenses of regular, irregular and stem-changing verbs, reflexive verbs, direct and indirect object pronouns, an introduction to commands, and the subjunctive mood. Vocabulary is presented in thematic units. No prerequisites.
FLAN 102 Elementary (Foreign Language) II Introduction to the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, aural comprehension, and culture in a contextualized format. Grammatical concepts include the usage of present tense of regular, irregular and stem-changing verbs, present progressive tense, articles, concepts of noun/adjective agreement, prepositions, preterit and imperfect tenses of regular, irregular and stem-changing verbs, reflexive verbs, direct and indirect object pronouns, an introduction to commands, and the subjunctive mood. Vocabulary is presented in thematic units. No prerequisites.
FLAN 201 Intermediate (Foreign Language) I Continued practice in the basic skills; review of grammar; reading of selected literary texts, and continued study of cultural elements. Grammatical concepts include the usage of the present and past subjunctive mood, the perfect tenses, and conditional verb forms. 201 incorporates brief readings and discussions based on literary works and cultural and historical information about the community.
FLAN 202 Intermediate(Foreign Language) II Continued practice in the basic skills; review of grammar; reading of selected literary texts, and continued study of cultural elements. Grammatical concepts include the usage of the present and past subjunctive mood, the perfect tenses, and conditional verb forms. 202 incorporates brief readings and discussions based on literary works and cultural and historical information about the community.
 

PHIL 121 Intro to Philosophy An examination of basic philosophical issues which arise in the fields of ethics, political philosophy, theory of knowledge, and metaphysics.

RELG 202 Old Testament Survey A survey of the Old Testament designed to introduce the student to the history, literature, and Religion of ancient Israel.

RELG 212 New Testament Survey A survey of the literature of the New Testament in the context of the early Christian church.

RELG 224 Christian Ethics A study of the Judeo-Christian heritage in ethics with attention to its Biblical and theological foundations. In addition, there will be an examination of how Christian ethics bears upon various contemporary moral issues.

RELG 251 World Religions A survey of the major Religions of the world.

CRIM 231 Introduction to Criminal Justice This course will cover the basics of the criminal justice system. Students will learn about the structure of the criminal justice system and the basic components of law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will get a close up look at the criminal justice system and be able to explain how criminal justice works on a practical basis. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. Students will also become familiar with the various participants in the criminal justice system and will ultimately come away with a clear concept of what their future role in this system will be, and how they can assist in the smooth workings of the system.

ECON 200 The Economic way of Thinking A broad introduction to economic concepts and how they can contribute to a better understanding of the world around us. Concepts are developed and applied to current economic and social problems and issues. It will involve less formal modeling than the 201 and 202 sequence. Not available to Economics or Economics/Pre-law majors.

ECON 201 Microeconomics A study of the individual business firm, with emphasis on an analysis of demand, supply, and costs; production and pricing under various market conditions; allocation of economic resources and determination of the shares of the national income paid to the different factors of production.


ECON 202 Macroeconomics A study of the national economy with emphasis on economic institutions, determination of national income, economic fluctuations, functions of money and banking, the economic role of government, labor problems, international trade, and economic growth. Prerequisite: ECON 201.
 

HIST 221 United States History I This class is designed as an introduction to American history from the pre-colonial period to the present. Major political, social, cultural and economic developments will receive attention. Prerequisites: HIST 111 or 112.
 

HIST 222 United States History II This class is designed as an introduction to American history from the pre-colonial period to the present. Major political, social, cultural and economic developments will receive attention. Prerequisites: HIST 111 or 112.
 

POL 229 The National Government This general introduction to the study of American government focuses on the federal level with special attention to the framing of the U.S. Constitution, the general organization and functioning of the national government, the nature of federalism, political parties, elections, and current issues of public policy at the national level. Prerequisite for most political science courses.
 

POL 230 State and Local Government This course gives special attention to federal-state relations and to the workings of state government in policy areas such as taxation, budgeting, and education. The politics of state government are closely examined. Local government is considered, but to a lesser degree. Prerequisite: POLS 229.
 

PSYC 222 General Psychology A study of the various fields of psychology: the developmental process, learning, motivation, emotion, frustration and adjustment, attention and perception, memory and cognition, group dynamics, and abnormal behavior. Attention is given to the application of these topics to problems of study, self-understanding, and adjustment to the demands of society. Required of all prospective teachers.
 

PSYC 232 Social Psychology A study of the way individuals’ thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by others. Topics for consideration include the manner in which status and role characteristics affect personality, the behavior of small groups, group pressure on individual judgment, leadership, crowd behavior, affiliation, and aggression. Offered in the spring.
 

PSYC 260 Developmental Psychology A study of the course of human development from conception to death, including physical, moral, cognitive, emotional, and social development. Normal developmental tasks are also examined. Offered in the fall.
 

SOCI 225 Principles of Sociology A study of human social interaction and society. Specific topics include cultural variations, socialization, social inequality, collective behavior, and global ecology. Offered in the fall and spring.
 

SOCI 226 Social Problems The nature and extent of social problems in contemporary life examined in terms of causes and constructive methods of prevention and treatment. Offered in the fall and summer.
 

SOCI 232 Social Psychology A study of forms of interaction of personalities which characterize social life. Topics for consideration include the manner in which status and role characteristics affect personality; the behavior of small groups studied experimentally, group pressure on individual judgment, rumor, leadership, crowd behavior, and social movement. Offered in the spring.
 

BIOL 101 Biology for Life An introduction to scientific reasoning and relevant biological concepts for non-science majors. The course emphasizes the ability to understand and evaluate critical issues in biology facing individuals and society. Topics covered include: growth and reproduction of cells and organisms, human genetics, human health and disease, how organisms evolve, and how living organisms interact with their environment. Three lecture and two laboratory hours each week.
 

BIOL 111 Basic Biology An introduction to biological chemistry, cell biology, energy relationships, reproduction, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week.
 

BIOL 202 Botany An introduction to all aspects of plant biology including the anatomy and development of flowering plants, the physiological mechanisms that regulate all plants, and a comparative survey of the reproduction, ecology, and structure of algae, fungi, bryophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms presented in a phylogenetic context. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall and Spring semesters. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 required (grade of C or better strongly recommended); CHEM 111 recommended.
 

BIOL 203 Zoology The biology of the major groups of animals, with emphasis on general structural plans and diversity, ecology, reproduction, and evolution. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall and Spring semesters. Prerequisite: BIOL 111 (grade of C or better strongly recommended).
 

BIOL 221 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology A detailed study of the structure and function of the major organ systems in man. Continuity is maintained by emphasizing regulation and integration of these systems. This one semester course meets three lecture and three laboratory hours each week. Fall, Spring, and occasional Summers. Prerequisite: BIOL 111 (grade of C or better strongly recommended).
 

BIOL 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology The first semester of a two semester sequence of Human Anatomy and Physiology. This course presents the chemical and cellular basis of human anatomy and physiology. This course covers organ systems to include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Laboratory work/participation is essential to the understanding of the material presented in this course. This course is intended for those students who are interested in careers in medicine, nursing, and biomedical sciences. BIOL 220 and BIOL 223 make up a two-semester sequence and both courses must be completed to cover the organ systems of the human body. Prerequisite: BIOL 111 (grade of C or better strongly recommended).
 

BIOL 223 Human Anatomy and Physiology II The second semester of a two semester sequence of Human Anatomy and Physiology. This course covers organ systems to include endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory work/participation is essential to the understanding of the material presented in this course. This course is intended for those students who are interested in careers in medicine, nursing, and biomedical sciences. BIOL 220 and BIOL 223 make up a two-semester sequence and both courses must be completed to cover the organ systems of the human body. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and BIOL 220.
 

BIOL 201 Cellular and Molecular Biology A study of the cell, with a focus on eukaryotic cells. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamental principles such as the unity and diversity of cell biology, the relationship between structure and function, cell regulation, the flow of genetic information, and cell specialization. Methods in cell biology will be interwoven throughout the course. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Spring semester and occasional summers. Prerequisite: BIOL 111 (grade of C or better strongly recommended).
 

BIOL 275 Fundamental Microbiology An introductory Microbiology course primarily designed for Pre-Nursing students. This course examines the beneficial and harmful interactions of microorganisms with humans. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental biology of pathogenic microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and helminthes) and the transmission, host immune responses, and the control of infectious disease. Laboratory emphasizes basic microbiological techniques and infection control. Biology majors in the pre-physician assistant, pre-medical, pre-dental, or pre-graduate school track should not take this course. The course may be appropriate for Biology majors who are pre-physical therapy. This course does not meet the prerequisite for BIOL 336 Medical Microbiology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours each week.
 

CHEM 111 General Chemistry I This course is an introduction to fundamental chemical concepts including states of matter, physical and chemical properties, stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, and chemical composition. An emphasis will be placed on atomic structure and its effects on the chemical and physical properties.

CHEM 113 General Chemistry II A continuation of CHEM 111. Emphasis will be placed on chemical and physical properties of solutions, chemical equilibria, acid/base equilibria, chemical kinetics, and descriptive chemistry. Less emphasis will be placed on general thermodynamics and electrochemistry. (Spring and Summer) Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CHEM 111.
 

CHEM 227 Organic Chemistry I A mechanistic approach to the chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. Topics include spectroscopy, stereochemistry, lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. Prerequisite for 227: A grade of C or better in CHEM 113. Prerequisite for 228: A grade of C or better in CHEM 227.
 

CHEM 228 Organic Chemistry II A mechanistic approach to the chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. Topics include spectroscopy, stereochemistry, lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. Prerequisite for 227: A grade of C or better in CHEM 113. Prerequisite for 228: A grade of C or better in CHEM 227.
 

GEOL 111 Physical Geology An introductory study of earth materials and land forms and the processes at work upon and within the earth. In the laboratory, emphasis will be placed on the identification of earth materials (minerals and rocks), large-scale movements of the earth’s crust (plate tectonics) and the use of topographic maps. A partial list of topics includes: study of dwindling nonrenewable resources; geologic time; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic geology; geologic structures; the actions of wind, water, and glaciers. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. Prerequisites: None.
 

GEOL 112 Historical Geology A history of the earth concerned with the changes in the earth’s crust and the life that has existed upon that crust. Laboratory work will include study of fossils and an introduction to geologic maps. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: GEOL 111.
 

GEOL 111 Physical Geology An introductory study of earth materials and land forms and the processes at work upon and within the earth. In the laboratory, emphasis will be placed on the identification of earth materials (minerals and rocks), large-scale movements of the earth’s crust (plate tectonics) and the use of topographic maps. A partial list of topics includes: study of dwindling nonrenewable resources; geologic time; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic geology; geologic structures; the actions of wind, water, and glaciers. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. Prerequisites: None.
 

GEOL 221 Environmental Geology The geology applied to living. It involves the examination of how natural geologic processes,such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions (internal processes), and flooding, shoreline and coastal processes, ice, wind, climate (surface processes) and use of minerals, energy, and water (resource processes) influence human activities sometimes causing homelessness, property damage, etc., and in some cases how human activities such as the pollution of water, air, and waste disposal (pollution processes) influence geologic processes. This course involves the examination of geologic hazards and what potential activities can be undertaken to minimize geologic disasters. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: GEOL 111.
 

PHYS 221 General Physics I An algebra/trigonometry-based study of classical mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, optics and nuclear phenomena. Laboratory work is coordinated with lectures. Intended for those interested in the quantitative investigation of the natural world. Prerequisite: MATH 112.
 

PHYS 222 General Physics II An algebra/trigonometry-based study of classical mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, optics and nuclear phenomena. Laboratory work is coordinated with lectures. Intended for those interested in the quantitative investigation of the natural world. Prerequisite: MATH 112.
 

PHYS 251 Fundamentals of Physics I A calculus-based study of classical mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, optics and nuclear phenomena. Differential and integral calculus is used in conceptual development and problemsolving. Laboratory work is coordinated with lectures. Intended for chemistry, chemistry and math majors. Prerequisite: MATH 122.
 

PHYS 252 Fundamentals of Physics II A calculus-based study of classical mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, optics and nuclear phenomena. Differential and integral calculus is used in conceptual development and problemsolving. Laboratory work is coordinated with lectures. Intended for biochemistry, chemistry and math majors. Prerequisite: MATH 122.
 

MATH 160 Elementary Statistics Emphasis on statistical inference beginning with a study of elementary probability and continuing to "decision making" through topics that include: mean, standard deviation, analysis of variance, regression analysis of variance, regression analysis, and hypothesis testing.
 

MATH 111 College Algebra (Credit in MATH 111 is not allowed if students have credit in MATH 122.) A basic study of logic, structure, and foundations of algebra. Major topics include functions, inequalities, equations, roots, radicals and exponents.
 

MATH 112 Trigonometry A study of trigonometric functions, derivation of formulas, the solution of right and oblique triangles with practical applications, solving trigonometric equations, and verifying trigonometric identities, other topics include vectors, complex numbers, and logarithms. Prerequisite: A student should be proficient in algebra and geometry.
 

MATH 122 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I Topics included: directed distance, slope of straight line, equations of a line, angle between two lines, conic sections, functions of one variable, graphs of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, differentials, related rates, maximum and minimum problems, Rolle's and mean value theorems, integration, area, properties of the definite integral, and application of the definite integral.
 

MATH 223 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II Topics included: differentiation and the integration of logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, and rational functions, and other special forms, approximating definite integral, polar and Cartesian equations of conic sections, and hyperbolic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 122.
 

MATH 224 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III Topics included: vectors in a plane, dot product, derivative of vector value functions, arc length, velocity vector, acceleration vector, unit tangent and normal vectors, curvature, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, vectors in three dimensions, cross product, lines in space, surfaces and revolution, limits of functions of two or more variables, continuity, partial differentiation, double and triple integrals and series. Prerequisite: MATH 223.
 

PE 185 Lifetime Wellness Required of all non-majors and Sport Management Majors as part of the General College Curriculum. Guides the student in leading a healthier life. Classroom lectures cover topics that include nutrition, the relationship between fitness and wellness, cardiovascular disease risk management, cancer risk management, stress management techniques, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases, smoking cessation, cardiovascular assessment and exercise prescription, body composition assessment and weight control, and other relevant wellness and fitness issues. Lectures are supplemented by laboratory and physical activities.

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